Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level H , Case PD, Shelf 203, Box I

Window in the Foscari Palace, Venice

Watercolour
1845 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Watercolour sketches of this kind were usually the first stage in the preparation of book illustrations. They were often highly coloured, even if the image was intended to be reproduced as a print in black and white.

People
Ruskin was one of the most influential writers on art and politics in the 19th century. His early writings, which advocated the work of J.M.W. Turner and Pre-Raphaelitism, and his enthusiasm for Medieval Gothic, had a major impact on painting and architecture. He was a good artist and draughtsman in his own right, as he had been taught by the watercolour painters Copley Fielding and James Duffield Harding. He wrote a major work of criticism entitled `The Stones of Venice' which was published in three volumes from 1851 to 1853.

Subjects Depicted
In 1845 Ruskin made meticulous sketches of details of Venetian architecture, and many (but not this one) were reproduced as illustrations to his book. Ruskin argued that Venetian Gothic architecture was a good example of a flourishing cultural unity, of a kind that had been almost lost in his own day, and he used the exquisite details found in the buildings of Venice to prove his case.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Pencil and watercolour on paper
Brief Description
Watercolour of a window in the Foscari Palace, John Ruskin, Venice, 1845
Physical Description
Drawing showing architectural details of a window in the Foscari Palace, Venice.
Dimensions
  • Height: 46.6cm
  • Width: 31.6cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 15/08/2000 by PaperCons Estimated mount size previously given 53x38
Marks and Inscriptions
Inscribed: 'Ca' Foscari No.4 September 1845'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: John Ruskin was one of the most influential writers on art and politics in the 19th century. His enthusiasm for Medieval Gothic had a major impact on painting and architecture. This sketch is one of the details of Venetian Gothic architecture he made in preparation for his most significant publication, 'The Stones of Venice' (1851).(27/03/2003)
Object history
Painted in Italy by John Ruskin (born in London, 1819, died in Brantwood, Cumbria, 1900)
Place Depicted
Summary
Object Type
Watercolour sketches of this kind were usually the first stage in the preparation of book illustrations. They were often highly coloured, even if the image was intended to be reproduced as a print in black and white.

People
Ruskin was one of the most influential writers on art and politics in the 19th century. His early writings, which advocated the work of J.M.W. Turner and Pre-Raphaelitism, and his enthusiasm for Medieval Gothic, had a major impact on painting and architecture. He was a good artist and draughtsman in his own right, as he had been taught by the watercolour painters Copley Fielding and James Duffield Harding. He wrote a major work of criticism entitled `The Stones of Venice' which was published in three volumes from 1851 to 1853.

Subjects Depicted
In 1845 Ruskin made meticulous sketches of details of Venetian architecture, and many (but not this one) were reproduced as illustrations to his book. Ruskin argued that Venetian Gothic architecture was a good example of a flourishing cultural unity, of a kind that had been almost lost in his own day, and he used the exquisite details found in the buildings of Venice to prove his case.
Bibliographic References
  • pp. 82-3Christopher Newall ;with contributions by Christopher Baker, Ian Jeffrey and Conal Shields, John Ruskin :artist and observer Ottawa : National Gallery of Canada ; London : Paul Holberton Publishing, 2014. ISBN: 9781907372575
  • Coombs, Katherine British watercolours : 1750-1950 . London: V&A Publications, 2012p.56, pl.45
Collection
Accession Number
D.1726-1908

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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