Self-Portrait thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 54, Henrietta Street Room

This object consists of 2 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait
ca. 1690 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Most artists have attempted to portray themselves, as they cannot resist trying their skills on their own image, especially if they have made a living by portraiture.

Subjects Depicted
This self-portrait of Kneller shows him as he wished to be seen, as a gentleman wearing a fashionable wig. The emphasis on the eyes is a typical result of self-conscious self-portraits, done with the aid of a mirror.

People
Kneller was born in Lübeck, Germany. He studied mathematics and military fortification at Leyden University about 1662, and was then apprenticed in Amsterdam to the painters Ferdinand Bol and Rembrandt. He travelled to Italy, particularly Rome and Venice. He settled in England in 1676, and by 1678 had secured royal patronage. Kneller was appointed in 1688 as Principal Painter to William III and was knighted in 1692. Kneller became a leading fashionable portrait painter. He inherited the leading and fashionable position of Lely as a prolific exponent of the baroque portrait in England. His famous series of 36 by 28 inch half-length portraits (Kit-cat portraits), named after the Kit-cat Club, whose members were the sitters, decisively influenced the course of 18th-century English portraiture. He was also renowned for the series of portraits of ladies at the royal court, the Hampton Court 'Beauties' 1690-1691.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Oil Paintings
  • Frames (Furnishings)
Materials and Techniques
oil on canvas
Brief Description
Self Portrait of Sir Godfrey Kneller
Physical Description
Self-portrait
Dimensions
  • Height: 38cm
  • Width: 31cm
This print was originally part of a volume that was broken up into individual plates. Dimensions taken from departmental notes.
Style
Gallery Label
British Galleries: British people had long preferred portraits to other forms of art. Sir Godfrey Kneller was the leading portrait painter of his day. He painted himself as he wished to be seen, as a gentleman, wearing a fashionable wig. The emphasis on the eyes is typical of self-portraits, which were done with the aid of a mirror.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Rev. Alexander Dyce
Object history
Bequeathed by Rev. Alexander Dyce, 1869

Painted in London by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (born in Lübeck, Germany,1646, died in London, 1723)

Painted in Britain
Subject depicted
Summary
Object Type
Most artists have attempted to portray themselves, as they cannot resist trying their skills on their own image, especially if they have made a living by portraiture.

Subjects Depicted
This self-portrait of Kneller shows him as he wished to be seen, as a gentleman wearing a fashionable wig. The emphasis on the eyes is a typical result of self-conscious self-portraits, done with the aid of a mirror.

People
Kneller was born in Lübeck, Germany. He studied mathematics and military fortification at Leyden University about 1662, and was then apprenticed in Amsterdam to the painters Ferdinand Bol and Rembrandt. He travelled to Italy, particularly Rome and Venice. He settled in England in 1676, and by 1678 had secured royal patronage. Kneller was appointed in 1688 as Principal Painter to William III and was knighted in 1692. Kneller became a leading fashionable portrait painter. He inherited the leading and fashionable position of Lely as a prolific exponent of the baroque portrait in England. His famous series of 36 by 28 inch half-length portraits (Kit-cat portraits), named after the Kit-cat Club, whose members were the sitters, decisively influenced the course of 18th-century English portraiture. He was also renowned for the series of portraits of ladies at the royal court, the Hampton Court 'Beauties' 1690-1691.
Collection
Accession Number
DYCE.12&:1

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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