Collar thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Collar

ca. 1900 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Detachable collars and cuffs were popular because they added colour and decoration to the plainest of outfits. They were frequently used by the embroiderers of the Glasgow School of Art and existing photographs show the most famous exponents, Jessie Newbery and Anne Macbeth, dressed in examples of their own work.

This collar and belt (see also museum no. Circ.190-1953) are meticulously made. The collar fastens with a hand-made drawstring looped through an embroidered border at the neck edge. The cord passes through specially worked detached eyelet holes, finished off with glass beads. Similarly, the belt fastens with four metal-set glass bead fasteners (one missing). Newbery used Pearsall's Mallard Floss silks in her work.

Both items show a characteristic pattern of 'Glasgow' roses. However, the shape of the collar is evolved from Renaissance design. Jessie Newbery was greatly interested in the decoration of this period and her own wedding dress, which she designed in 1889, was based on a St Ursula's dress in Carpaccio's painting (Accademia, Venice). Newbery believed design to be the most important element in her work. Despite being highly stylised, her patterns are based on her lifelong interest in botany. Each element was reduced to a geometrical, almost abstract shorthand which helped evolved the Glasgow style.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silk ground, with appliqué of silk, embroidered in silk threads in satin stitch and couching, with glass bead and needle lace trimmings
Brief Description
Embroidered collar
Physical Description
Collar
Dimensions
  • Height: 32.4cm
  • Width: 71.1cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 22/01/1999 by sf
Style
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The decoration of artistic clothing provided an ideal opportunity for students of embroidery at the Glasgow School of Art. The shape of this collar was influenced by Renaissance examples but the design was radical and modern. The rose and leaf motifs are reduced to the geometrical, almost abstract, shorthand of the Glasgow style.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given in the name of the late Mrs R. A. Walter
Object history
Designed and made in Glasgow by Jessie Newbery (born in Paisley, Renfrewshire, 1864, died in Dorset, 1948)
Summary
Detachable collars and cuffs were popular because they added colour and decoration to the plainest of outfits. They were frequently used by the embroiderers of the Glasgow School of Art and existing photographs show the most famous exponents, Jessie Newbery and Anne Macbeth, dressed in examples of their own work.



This collar and belt (see also museum no. Circ.190-1953) are meticulously made. The collar fastens with a hand-made drawstring looped through an embroidered border at the neck edge. The cord passes through specially worked detached eyelet holes, finished off with glass beads. Similarly, the belt fastens with four metal-set glass bead fasteners (one missing). Newbery used Pearsall's Mallard Floss silks in her work.



Both items show a characteristic pattern of 'Glasgow' roses. However, the shape of the collar is evolved from Renaissance design. Jessie Newbery was greatly interested in the decoration of this period and her own wedding dress, which she designed in 1889, was based on a St Ursula's dress in Carpaccio's painting (Accademia, Venice). Newbery believed design to be the most important element in her work. Despite being highly stylised, her patterns are based on her lifelong interest in botany. Each element was reduced to a geometrical, almost abstract shorthand which helped evolved the Glasgow style.
Bibliographic References
  • Greenhalgh, Paul (Ed.), Art Nouveau: 1890-1914 . London: V&A Publications, 2000
  • Karen Livingstone and Linda Parry, eds., International Arts & Crafts (V&A: V&A Publications, 2005), p.75.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.189-1953

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL