The Girl-in-a-Swing thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 53a

The Girl-in-a-Swing

Figure
1749-1759 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This figure is a domestic ornament. The figure faces forward, and is less-well finished at the back, so the piece was probably intended to be viewed from the front only. It may have been displayed against a wall, on a chimneypiece or bracket, or in a glazed cabinet.

People
The so-called 'Girl-in-a-Swing' group of porcelain figures, scent bottles and wares were named after this figure. English porcelain collectors first identified these as a distinctive group in the 1920s, but their maker was not firmly identified until 1993. They were originally attributed to the Chelsea factory of Nicholas Sprimont (1716-1771). Collectors then suggested that they were probably made at a rival factory set up by Staffordshire workmen who had quit Sprimont's works. Recent research has proved that these figures and wares were made by Charles Gouyn (died 1785). Gouyn was a second-generation jeweller with premises in St James's, London, and he had been a partner in the Chelsea factory until sometime before March 1749. However, the precise location of his factory, and the identity of the modeller of these distinctive figures, remain unknown.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Soft-paste porcelain, slip cast
Brief Description
Figure, soft-paste porcelain, slip cast, 'The Girl-in-a-Swing', England, Charles Gouyn's factory, ca. 1749-1759.
Physical Description
Soft-paste porcelain, slip cast depicting a girl on a swing. Oval base.
Dimensions
  • Height: 15.9cm
  • Approx. width: 16.8cm
Dimensions checked: Registered Description; 01/01/1998 by KN
Gallery Label
British Galleries: Many different recipes were in use during the early, experimental period of the English porcelain industry. Charles Gouyn's products had a very glassy body, making them liable to slump in the kiln. This figure gave its name to a group of figures and other wares now known to have been made by Gouyn.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Presented by Lt. Col. K. Dingwall, DSO with Art Fund support
Object history
Made at the factory of Charles Gouyn (born in Dieppe, France, died in London, 1785) possibly in St James's, London
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This figure is a domestic ornament. The figure faces forward, and is less-well finished at the back, so the piece was probably intended to be viewed from the front only. It may have been displayed against a wall, on a chimneypiece or bracket, or in a glazed cabinet.

People
The so-called 'Girl-in-a-Swing' group of porcelain figures, scent bottles and wares were named after this figure. English porcelain collectors first identified these as a distinctive group in the 1920s, but their maker was not firmly identified until 1993. They were originally attributed to the Chelsea factory of Nicholas Sprimont (1716-1771). Collectors then suggested that they were probably made at a rival factory set up by Staffordshire workmen who had quit Sprimont's works. Recent research has proved that these figures and wares were made by Charles Gouyn (died 1785). Gouyn was a second-generation jeweller with premises in St James's, London, and he had been a partner in the Chelsea factory until sometime before March 1749. However, the precise location of his factory, and the identity of the modeller of these distinctive figures, remain unknown.
Bibliographic Reference
Baker, Malcolm, and Brenda Richardson (eds.), A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: V&A Publications, 1999.
Collection
Accession Number
C.587-1922

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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