Jug thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 52a

Jug

1779 (dated)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
These jugs with cabbage-leaf moulded patterns were introduced in the 1750s. They remained very popular in Britain until about 1800. The lip was sometimes formed as a mask, as in this example, or the jug could have a plain cylindrical neck.

Place
The jugs were first made at the Worcester porcelain factory, and then at Lowestoft (Suffolk), Caughley and several of the Liverpool factories. The design was also copied in Chinese porcelain for export to the West.

Marketing
The Caughley factory was one of the few British porcelain factories to have a significant local market. The factory had a warehouse nearby in Bridgenorth, where 'country' dealers could buy wares. London dealers, however, had to obtain their stock from the factory's manager, Thomas Turner. The painted monogram on this piece would have been specially commissioned, possibly through the Bridgenorth shop or from the factory itself.

Other large porcelain factories, such as Worcester, sold much of their output through wholesale china dealers in London. A Worcester wholesale price list of about 1755-1756 describes these jugs as 'Dutch Jugs', and gives their wholesale price as three shillings and six pence, or eight shillings, apparently per dozen, according to their size.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Soft-paste porcelain moulded in relief and transfer-printed and painted in underglaze blue
Brief Description
Jug of soft-paste porcelain, moulded in relief and transfer-printed and painted in underglaze blue, Caughley Porcelain Factory, Caughley, dated 1779.
Physical Description
Jug of soft-paste porcelain, moulded in relief and transfer-printed and painted in underglaze blue. Egg-shaped body moulded with a cabbage-leaf pattern. Cylindrical neck, lip moulded with a bearded mask and scroll handle. On either side of the body and neck are printed, respectively, with large and small groups of flowers. 'JL' is painted on the front in a medallion above the date 1779.
Dimensions
  • Approx. height: 20cm
  • Approx. width: 15cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'S' (In underglaze blue)
  • 'JL' [In monogram] (In the front in a medallion)
  • '1779' (Painted below the medallion)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The jug has the monogram 'JL' in the medallion, the initials of the original owner. It must have been a special order from the Caughley factory and was probably used for wine or cider.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Alfred Darby, Esq.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
These jugs with cabbage-leaf moulded patterns were introduced in the 1750s. They remained very popular in Britain until about 1800. The lip was sometimes formed as a mask, as in this example, or the jug could have a plain cylindrical neck.

Place
The jugs were first made at the Worcester porcelain factory, and then at Lowestoft (Suffolk), Caughley and several of the Liverpool factories. The design was also copied in Chinese porcelain for export to the West.

Marketing
The Caughley factory was one of the few British porcelain factories to have a significant local market. The factory had a warehouse nearby in Bridgenorth, where 'country' dealers could buy wares. London dealers, however, had to obtain their stock from the factory's manager, Thomas Turner. The painted monogram on this piece would have been specially commissioned, possibly through the Bridgenorth shop or from the factory itself.

Other large porcelain factories, such as Worcester, sold much of their output through wholesale china dealers in London. A Worcester wholesale price list of about 1755-1756 describes these jugs as 'Dutch Jugs', and gives their wholesale price as three shillings and six pence, or eight shillings, apparently per dozen, according to their size.
Bibliographic Reference
For these patterns, see The Caughley Society, Caughley Blue & White Patterns, 2012, cat. C03
Collection
Accession Number
C.57-1921

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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