Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 118a

Egg Stand

ca. 1790 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Made as a high-footed salver (tray or 'waiter') with four holes for eggcups, this elegant egg stand would have been an ideal addition to the fashionable breakfast table. A minor drawback was the fact that the eggcup feet (which provided stability) had to be smaller than the bowls in order to lodge in the holes of the stand.

Design & Designing
Since it was probably copied from stronger Sheffield plate, this type of thinly-potted egg stand is highly vulnerable and rarely survives.It is not shown in the catalogues of creamware (a type of lead-glazed earthenware) manufacturers, so it was perhaps made in comparatively small numbers. By the early 19th century, however, it was a well-known shape in transfer-printed blue-and-white earthenware, when it no doubt formed part of breakfast sets. Sturdy stands of moulded brown salt-glazed stoneware are also known, made at Brampton in Derbyshire towards the middle of the 19th century.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 7 parts.

  • Stand
  • Egg Cup
  • Egg Cup
  • Egg Cup
  • Egg Cup
  • Egg Cup
  • Egg Cup
Materials and Techniques
Moulded creamware (lead-glazed earthenware)
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.7cm
  • Width: 20cm
  • Depth: 12cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; by AS
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The new fashions in displaying food were adapted to the requirements of the different social classes. The less wealthy often used elaborate tablewares in cheaper materials. This egg stand has been made in inexpensive creamware, while the one displayed nearby appears to be silver but is actually Sheffield plate.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Comdr. J. A. L. Drummond, R.N. from the Lily Antrobus Collection.
Object history
Made in Yorkshire or Staffordshire
Summary
Object Type
Made as a high-footed salver (tray or 'waiter') with four holes for eggcups, this elegant egg stand would have been an ideal addition to the fashionable breakfast table. A minor drawback was the fact that the eggcup feet (which provided stability) had to be smaller than the bowls in order to lodge in the holes of the stand.

Design & Designing
Since it was probably copied from stronger Sheffield plate, this type of thinly-potted egg stand is highly vulnerable and rarely survives.It is not shown in the catalogues of creamware (a type of lead-glazed earthenware) manufacturers, so it was perhaps made in comparatively small numbers. By the early 19th century, however, it was a well-known shape in transfer-printed blue-and-white earthenware, when it no doubt formed part of breakfast sets. Sturdy stands of moulded brown salt-glazed stoneware are also known, made at Brampton in Derbyshire towards the middle of the 19th century.
Collection
Accession Number
C.5 to F-1945

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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