Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Jar and Lid

1690-1720 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This large lidded jar is one of a set of five (C.1520&A to 1525&A-1910). It is a splendid example of the type of porcelain made in late 17th to early 18th-century Japan for export to Europe. Wares of this shape and size would not have been marketed in Japan. The areas of dark blue were achieved by painting with cobalt oxide under a clear glaze and firing to a high temperature in a reducing atmosphere. The gold, red and other enamel colours were applied and fused on in subsequent, low-temperature firings. The distinctive so-called Imari-style colour scheme was much copied by 18th-century European manufacturers.

Place
Imari was the port in western Japan through which this and other products of the nearby Arita kilns were shipped. Porcelains for export were sent to Dejima, a small island in Nagasaki harbour, for shipment abroad by Dutch and Chinese merchants.

Time
At the time this vase was made, merchants of the Dutch East India Company were the only Europeans permitted to conduct trade in Japan. This was due to the Japanese government's seclusion policy, which was enforced from 1639 until the mid-1850s. European hard-paste porcelain comparable in quality to Chinese and Japanese imports was first made at Meissen in Germany in the early years of the 18th century. Porcelain was made in Britain from the late 1740s onwards.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Jar
  • Lid
Materials and Techniques
Porcelain painted in underglaze blue, overglaze enamels, and gold
Brief Description
Jar and lid, porcelain painted in underglaze blue, overglaze enamels and gilt; Japan, Arita kilns (Imari type), Edo period, 1690-1720
Physical Description
Jar and cover painted in blue, red and gold with floral motifs including peonies, prunus and grape vines
Dimensions
  • Height: 72.6cm
  • Diameter: 36.8cm
Height checked: Publication; 08/10/2001 by APS Diameter from registers
Styles
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This vase is one of a set of five large vases and beakers of a type made specially for export to Europe. Large vases such as these were often displayed at the top of staircases or, as here, in fireplaces, during the summer months when fires were not needed.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Salting Bequest
Object history
Made in Arita, Japan
Subject depicted
Summary
Object Type
This large lidded jar is one of a set of five (C.1520&A to 1525&A-1910). It is a splendid example of the type of porcelain made in late 17th to early 18th-century Japan for export to Europe. Wares of this shape and size would not have been marketed in Japan. The areas of dark blue were achieved by painting with cobalt oxide under a clear glaze and firing to a high temperature in a reducing atmosphere. The gold, red and other enamel colours were applied and fused on in subsequent, low-temperature firings. The distinctive so-called Imari-style colour scheme was much copied by 18th-century European manufacturers.

Place
Imari was the port in western Japan through which this and other products of the nearby Arita kilns were shipped. Porcelains for export were sent to Dejima, a small island in Nagasaki harbour, for shipment abroad by Dutch and Chinese merchants.

Time
At the time this vase was made, merchants of the Dutch East India Company were the only Europeans permitted to conduct trade in Japan. This was due to the Japanese government's seclusion policy, which was enforced from 1639 until the mid-1850s. European hard-paste porcelain comparable in quality to Chinese and Japanese imports was first made at Meissen in Germany in the early years of the 18th century. Porcelain was made in Britain from the late 1740s onwards.
Other Number
Loan no. 47
Collection
Accession Number
C.1521&A-1910

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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