Kimono Fabric

1860-1867 (made)
Kimono Fabric thumbnail 1
Kimono Fabric thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery
Place Of Origin

Object Type
In Japan, where this length of silk crepe was made, the material would have been used to make a kimono. It contains enough cloth to make one garment. Both sexes wore kimono, but the design of this particular length of fabric suggests that it would have been used for a woman's clothing.

Materials & Making
The pattern of bamboo and flowering trees was created using a resist-dyeing technique. Rice paste was applied to certain parts of the cloth to form a protective coating that prevented penetration of the dye. Once the dye was dry the paste was washed away. Different areas were protected at various stages of the patterning process.

Time
Japanese objects were imported into Britain in large numbers in the second half of the 19th century. Japanese dyed textiles were very different from those made in Britain. The bold design and bright colours of this length of cloth would have been highly appealing. Fabrics like this would have been used to make exotic garments or used for interior decoration.

Historical Associations
Japan was keen to show off its textile skills at the big exhibitions that took place in Europe in the 19th century. This length was shown at the Paris International Exhibition of 1867 where it was bought by the Museum.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silk crepe, with resist-dyed decoration
Brief Description
Silk crepe - red bamboo design, Japan, 1860-1867
Dimensions
  • Length: 1800cm
  • Width: 47cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: JAPANESE OBJECTS FROM THE PARIS EXHIBITION OF 1867
The display organised by the Japanese at the Paris Exhibition of 1867 was a great success. Crowds flocked to see it. These are some of the many items acquired by the Museum. They are typical of the kind of objects made in Japan to meet the growing European demand.(27/03/2003)
Subject depicted
Summary
Object Type
In Japan, where this length of silk crepe was made, the material would have been used to make a kimono. It contains enough cloth to make one garment. Both sexes wore kimono, but the design of this particular length of fabric suggests that it would have been used for a woman's clothing.

Materials & Making
The pattern of bamboo and flowering trees was created using a resist-dyeing technique. Rice paste was applied to certain parts of the cloth to form a protective coating that prevented penetration of the dye. Once the dye was dry the paste was washed away. Different areas were protected at various stages of the patterning process.

Time
Japanese objects were imported into Britain in large numbers in the second half of the 19th century. Japanese dyed textiles were very different from those made in Britain. The bold design and bright colours of this length of cloth would have been highly appealing. Fabrics like this would have been used to make exotic garments or used for interior decoration.

Historical Associations
Japan was keen to show off its textile skills at the big exhibitions that took place in Europe in the 19th century. This length was shown at the Paris International Exhibition of 1867 where it was bought by the Museum.
Collection
Accession Number
842-1869

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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