Vase thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Vase

ca. 1857 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This vase and cover reflect the ever popular taste taste for 18th-century French porcelain, especially that made by the royal factory at Sèvres, near Paris. The style of flower painting, the turquoise blue and the gilding all imitate French porcelain.The vase could have been used to contain rose petals or pot pourri: the pierced leaf-shapes below the vase rim would have allowed the scent to circulate.

Social Class
Although clearly of superb quality, both in the brilliantly white bone china and the fine painting, this vase and cover were less expensive to buy than the 18th-century French Sèvres porcelain they copy. With this classical ovoid form and pretty decoration, Minton's were meeting the ambitions of the newly wealthy for the genuinely 'old French' furnishings of the rich.

Time
Minton's production of ornamental porcelain increased greatly as the influence of Herbert Minton became more apparent. He became director in 1834, and by 1840 some 255 different designs were in production; by 1900 the number had risen to 3,500. It was a considerable commercial investment and the factory naturally borrowed ideas from a wide variety of sources. Despite other fashionable trends, French 18th-century porcelain remained popular throughout the 19th century.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Vase
  • Cover
Materials and Techniques
Porcelain, painted and gilded
Brief Description
Vase with Cover, Minton & Co., Stoke-on-Trent, about 1857
Dimensions
  • Height: 27cm
  • Width: 16cm
  • Base diameter: 10cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 20/11/1999 by LH
Gallery Label
British Galleries: VASES
Just as in modern homes, dramatically different styles of ornament could be displayed together in Victorian houses. The style of the red 'art pottery' vase was strongly influenced by Chinese forms and glazes. It would have seemed startingly modern beside the delicate painting and gilding of the other, more commercially popular vases.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Made by Minton & Co., Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire
Summary
Object Type
This vase and cover reflect the ever popular taste taste for 18th-century French porcelain, especially that made by the royal factory at Sèvres, near Paris. The style of flower painting, the turquoise blue and the gilding all imitate French porcelain.The vase could have been used to contain rose petals or pot pourri: the pierced leaf-shapes below the vase rim would have allowed the scent to circulate.

Social Class
Although clearly of superb quality, both in the brilliantly white bone china and the fine painting, this vase and cover were less expensive to buy than the 18th-century French Sèvres porcelain they copy. With this classical ovoid form and pretty decoration, Minton's were meeting the ambitions of the newly wealthy for the genuinely 'old French' furnishings of the rich.

Time
Minton's production of ornamental porcelain increased greatly as the influence of Herbert Minton became more apparent. He became director in 1834, and by 1840 some 255 different designs were in production; by 1900 the number had risen to 3,500. It was a considerable commercial investment and the factory naturally borrowed ideas from a wide variety of sources. Despite other fashionable trends, French 18th-century porcelain remained popular throughout the 19th century.
Collection
Accession Number
4324:1, 2-1857

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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