Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Vase

  • Place of origin:

    Wrecclesham (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1901 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Gellatly, William (designer)
    A Harris & Sons (manufacturer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Earthenware with sgraffiato decoration with the slip in white under a yellow glaze

  • Museum number:

    1171-1901

  • Gallery location:

    British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery, case 4

Object Type
This vase, in a classic Chinese shape and made in red earthenware, is covered with a yellow glaze. The designer and potter, William Gellatly, has incised patterns from a variety of sources through the glaze. The most obvious of these are Celtic-style knots, which would appeal to collectors in Arts and Crafts circles. Although of a perfectly functional shape, the vase is also decorative enough to stand out in any interior.

People
Around 1880 Absalom Harris, a farmer, was also the proprietor of the Farnham Pottery in Surrey. His pottery accounts record his dealings in potatoes, barley and straw and the dates on which his cows and horse were mated, as well as the production of utilitarian earthenwares. The painter Myles Birket Foster (1825-1899) asked him to copy a French green-glazed garden vase. To Harris's surprise the extra vases, over and above Foster's order, sold well. He then began to make copies of other historic wares. In 1889 W.H. Allen, formerly advisor to the V&A, became master at Farnham School of Art. He suggested that Tudor greenwares from the Museum's collections could be used as sources for the pottery's work. At the same time, Allen's students, like William Gellatly, were able to practise their skills at the pottery using yellow and brown glazes as well as the Tudor green.

Trading
In the 1890s the London retailers Heal's and Liberty's, and the Rural Industries Society, began to stock the new wares made by the Farnham Pottery. The pottery's turnover more than doubled. Extra staff were employed, and a showroom was built at the works. Art wares provided a good alternative source of income at a time when the potter's traditional markets were in decline.

Physical description

Vase of red earthenware with sgraffiato decoration, and with a wide recurved mouth, the slip in white under a yellow glaze, the lower part is decorated with five bunches of Spanish chestnuts separated by vertical leaves, round the shoulder is a raised band above which is a row of opening chestnuts.

Place of Origin

Wrecclesham (made)

Date

ca. 1901 (made)

Artist/maker

Gellatly, William (designer)
A Harris & Sons (manufacturer)

Materials and Techniques

Earthenware with sgraffiato decoration with the slip in white under a yellow glaze

Marks and inscriptions

'Yellow'
Incised on the underside

Dimensions

Height: 27.6 cm, Width: 18.8 cm

Object history note

Designed by William Gellatly, probably of the Farnham School of Art; made by A Harris & Sons, Farnham Pottery, Wrecclesham, Surrey. Purchased with 1170-1901 for 15s.

Descriptive line

Farnham yellow vase of red earthenware with sgraffiato decoration, and with a wide recurved mouth, the slip in white under a yellow glaze, designed by William Gellatly, made by A Harris and Sons, Wrecclesham, ca. 1901.

Labels and date

British Galleries:
In 1872 a country pottery was established in Farnham, Surrey. It specialised in making garden pots and domestic wares using yellow or brown glazes typical of the area. The pottery business expanded in about 1890, and developed a close working relationship with Farnham School of Art. Students were involved in designing and decorating pots. [27/03/2003]
Vase
Made by William J.P.R. Gellatly, Farnham School of Art, Farnham School of Art, Farnham, England, about 1901

1171-1901 [23/05/2008]

Materials

Earthenware; Slip; Glaze

Techniques

Sgraffito; Glazed

Subjects depicted

Chestnut (nut)

Categories

Ceramics; Vases; Earthenware

Collection

Ceramics Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.