Print

1749 (dated)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 52, The George Levy Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This object is a particular type of print called an engraving. Lines are cut into the flat surface of a metal plate using sharp tools. The engraving is made by transferring ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
The peace treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle was signed in 1748, ending the War of Austrian Succession. On 27 April 1749 a firework spectacular took place in St James's Park, London, to celebrate the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. This print shows the large wooden pavilion, painted to resemble stone, that was erected to launch the fireworks. The pavilion was 410 feet long and 114 feet high.

The firework display was not an unqualified success: it rained on the day; the pavilion housing the fireworks caught fire and burned to the ground; and there was a public fight when the pavilion's architect, the Chevalier Servandoni, drew his sword and confronted the organiser of the event, the Duke of Montagu.

People
The famous English composer George Frideric Handel wrote several pieces to celebrate the signing of the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. The most famous of these, the Music for the Royal Fireworks, was performed at the firework spectacular in St James's Park on 27 April 1749. The piece was a great success and is still one of Handel's most frequently performed compositions.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraving, ink on paper
Brief Description
Plan and elevation of the Royal Fireworks, St James's Palace, Designed by Giovanni Niccolo Servandoni, engraved in London by George Vertue, 1749
Physical Description
Engraving on paper depicting a firework display
Dimensions
  • Paper height: 44cm
  • Paper width: 57cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) was celebrated in London by a spectacular firework display for which Handel wrote his 'Music for the Royal Fireworks'. Jonathan Tyers negotiated the right to hold a public rehearsal of the music at Vauxhall. The rehearsal was a great success but the performance in St James's Park was a disaster, ruined by rain, a public fight and the burning down of the pavilion.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by the Rev. R. Brooke
Object history
Designed by Giovanni Niccolo Servandoni (born in 1695, died in Paris, 1766); engraved in London by George Vertue (born in London, 1684, died there in 1756)
Subjects depicted
Places Depicted
Summary
Object Type
This object is a particular type of print called an engraving. Lines are cut into the flat surface of a metal plate using sharp tools. The engraving is made by transferring ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
The peace treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle was signed in 1748, ending the War of Austrian Succession. On 27 April 1749 a firework spectacular took place in St James's Park, London, to celebrate the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. This print shows the large wooden pavilion, painted to resemble stone, that was erected to launch the fireworks. The pavilion was 410 feet long and 114 feet high.

The firework display was not an unqualified success: it rained on the day; the pavilion housing the fireworks caught fire and burned to the ground; and there was a public fight when the pavilion's architect, the Chevalier Servandoni, drew his sword and confronted the organiser of the event, the Duke of Montagu.

People
The famous English composer George Frideric Handel wrote several pieces to celebrate the signing of the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. The most famous of these, the Music for the Royal Fireworks, was performed at the firework spectacular in St James's Park on 27 April 1749. The piece was a great success and is still one of Handel's most frequently performed compositions.
Collection
Accession Number
21228

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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