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vase

  • Object:

    Vase

  • Place of origin:

    Bombay (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1880 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Glazed earthenware

  • Museum number:

    IS.152-1883

  • Gallery location:

    Ceramics, Room 137, The Curtain Foundation Gallery, case 16, shelf 4

The Bombay School of Art's ceramic productions were traded under the name of Wonderland Art Pottery, directed by George Wilkins Terry who had been appointed as its first drawing master in 1857. The pottery flourished from the mid 1870s until about 1890, and continued in diminished form after Terry's retirement at that time into the early years of the 20th century. Early wares were influenced by those manufactured in Sind, because Terry set up his workshop with a Sindhi craftsman called Nur Muhammad. Soon, however, much of the decoration came to be influenced by the cave paintings at Ajanta, which had been rediscovered earlier in the century, and were copied by the School's students between 1872 and 1885. Liberty imported Bombay School of Art pottery to sell in its shop in Regent Street, London.

Physical description

Vase with bulbous body, cylindrical neck, and handles. Body divided into compartments containing floral design and running floral band in brown on yellow ground. Neck ornamented with flowers in brown and yellow ground and birds in yellow on brown ground. Designs inspired by the cave paintings at Ajanta.

Place of Origin

Bombay (made)

Date

ca. 1880 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Glazed earthenware

Dimensions

Height: 28 cm maximum, Diameter: 17 cm maximum

Object history note

Bought for the South Kensington Museum by Caspar Purdon Clarke on a puchasing trip to India, 1881-82

Historical context note

The Bombay School of Art's ceramic productions were traded under the name of Wonderland Art Pottery under the direction of George Wilkins Terry, who had been appointed as its first drawing master in 1857. The pottery flourished from the mid 1870s until about 1890, but limped on after Terry's retirement at that time into the the early years of the 20th century. Early wares were influenced by those manufactured in Sind as Terry set up his workshop with a Sindhi craftsman called Nur Muhammad. Soon, however, much of the decoration came to be influenced by the cave paintings at Ajanta, which had been discovered earlier in the century, and were copied by the Schools students over a period lasting from 1872-1885, elements of which were adapted and used to decorate the ceramics in an attempt to encourage traditions of Indian art rather than European ones. Liberty imported some wares to sell in its Regent Street shop in London See Stronge, Susan,'Wonderland', Ceramics: The International Journal of Ceramics and Glass, London, issue V, August 1987, pp. 48-53.

Descriptive line

Glazed earthenware Vase, Bombay School of Art, 19th Century.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

p. 238, cat. no. 307.
Bryant, Julius, Editor. Art and Design for All: The Victoria and Albert Museum. London: V&A Publishing, 2011. ISBN 9781851776665

Production Note

Bombay School of Art

Materials

Earthenware; Glaze

Techniques

Glazing; Modelling

Categories

Ceramics

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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