What a Woman may be, and yet not have the Vote thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

What a Woman may be, and yet not have the Vote

Poster
1913 (published)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Women's Suffrage movement in Britain was formalised in 1903 when Emmeline Pankhurst established the Women's Social and Political Union. Voting rights for women over 30 were granted in 1918, but equal rights with men (that is, at age 21) were not granted until 1928. This poster was produced by the Suffrage Atelier, a society formed in 1909, to 'encourage artists to forward the Women's Movement, and particularly the enfranchisement of women, by means of pictorial publications'. The relatively unsophisticated technique of block printing was partly a consequence of limited funds, but it also allowed 'fresh cartoons [to be] got out at very short notice'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Woodcut, coloured by hand
Brief Description
'What a woman may be, and yet not have the vote', woodcut poster issued by the Suffrage Atelier, London, 1913
Physical Description
Landscape format poster in green, red and black on white ground. Two strips of five images each, one above the other. The top row has the legend 'What a Woman may be and yet not have the Vote' and five images: Mayor, Nurse, Mother, Doctor or Teacher, Factory Hand. The bottom row has the legend 'What a Man may be & yet not lose the Vote' with five images: Convict, Lunatic, Proprietor of white Slaves, Unfit for Service, Drunkard.
Dimensions
  • Sheet height: 510mm
  • Sheet width: 773mm
Style
Credit line
Given by Miss A. E. Norris
Subjects depicted
Summary
The Women's Suffrage movement in Britain was formalised in 1903 when Emmeline Pankhurst established the Women's Social and Political Union. Voting rights for women over 30 were granted in 1918, but equal rights with men (that is, at age 21) were not granted until 1928. This poster was produced by the Suffrage Atelier, a society formed in 1909, to 'encourage artists to forward the Women's Movement, and particularly the enfranchisement of women, by means of pictorial publications'. The relatively unsophisticated technique of block printing was partly a consequence of limited funds, but it also allowed 'fresh cartoons [to be] got out at very short notice'.
Bibliographic Reference
Gravett, Paul and Harris Dunning, John Comics unmasked : art and anarchy in the UK London : The British Library 2014. ISBN: 9780712357357
Collection
Accession Number
E.646-1972

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record createdMarch 4, 2003
Record URL