Trousers

1845-1853 (made)
Trousers thumbnail 1
Trousers thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

When trousers became fashionable in the first decade of the 19th century, they retained wide fall-front closure commonly used in the late 18th century. This began to narrow in the 1820s, and by the 1830s a fly-front closure, as seen in this example, became the most usual form. Buttons on the waistband allow the attachment of braces. Linen and cotton in pale colours were a popular choice for summer wear. These trousers are reputed to have been worn by William Pierson Johnes, a linen merchant of New York City.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Linen twill, hand-sewn, brass
Brief Description
Pair of men's linen twill trousers, United States, 1845-1853
Physical Description
Pair of men's white linen twill trousers. Full length and fairly narrow, tapering slightly and then flaring to fit over the foot. There is a concealed fly front. The waist band is narrow and shaped with four brace buttons and there is a buckle stay at the centre back to adjust the fit. On the right-hand side inside the waist band is a pocket for a watch, and written inside in ink with 'W. P. Johnes'. The buttons and two pronged buckles are of brass.
Marks and Inscriptions
'W. P. Johnes' (Written in ink inside the watch pocket)
Credit line
Given by Captain Raymond Johnes
Summary
When trousers became fashionable in the first decade of the 19th century, they retained wide fall-front closure commonly used in the late 18th century. This began to narrow in the 1820s, and by the 1830s a fly-front closure, as seen in this example, became the most usual form. Buttons on the waistband allow the attachment of braces. Linen and cotton in pale colours were a popular choice for summer wear. These trousers are reputed to have been worn by William Pierson Johnes, a linen merchant of New York City.
Collection
Accession Number
T.177-1965

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record createdMarch 1, 2003
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