Eugénie Maria Wynne thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sculpture, Room 21a, The Dorothy and Michael Hintze Galleries

Eugénie Maria Wynne

Bust
1875 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This bust of Eugénie Maria Wynne ((1827–1899) was one of a number of portraits kept at the Wynne family's house, Garthewin in Denbighshire, North Wales. On the death of her grandson, who inherited the estate from an uncle, the house was sold and the portraits it contained (with the exception of this bust) were lent to the National Library of Wales, Cardiff. This bust was exhibited at the Society of French Artists, London, in 1875, soon after its execution. Its location was unknown until its appearance in London in the 1980s. A painted plaster cast of it was recently acquired by the National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. Eugénie's eldest brother, Eyre Crowe (1824-1910), trained as an artist in Paris under Paul Delaroche (1797-1856). Crowe's portrait of her is currently on loan to the National Library of Wales, Cardiff. In 1867 he was appointed one of the 13 Art Referees at the South Kensington Museum, following the departure of J. C. Robinson. Another brother, Sir Joseph Archer Crowe, was the art historian who published prolifically in collaboration with G. B. Cavalcaselle.

Dalou (1838-1902) was the son of a glove maker and initially trained in drawing at the Petit École in Paris. There he was encouraged to do sculpture. In 1854 he entered the École des Beaux-Arts, where he trained for four years. He was known for his left-wing political sympathies and was involved in the establishment of the Paris Commune in 1871. After his overthrow he was forced into exile in London, where he lived from 1871 until his return to Paris in 1879. In London he frequently exhibited at the Royal Academy and he was given a teaching appointment at the National Art Training School in South Kensington (later the Royal College of Art), where he had a profound effect on the development of British sculpture.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Terracotta
Brief Description
Bust, terracotta, Eugénie Maria Wynne, by Aimé Jules Dalou, Anglo-French, 1875
Physical Description
Mrs Wynne, middle-aged is shown wearing a lacy veil pinned onto the back of her hair, which is drawn back over her ears. She wears a low-necked dress. Her head is turned to her right. Signed.
Dimensions
  • Height: 56.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'DALOU / 1875' (signed under the left shoulder)
Gallery Label
Aimé-Jules Dalou (1838–1902) Portrait of Eugénie Maria Wynne (1827–99) 1875 Eugénie Wynne moved within the London and Paris art circles, having grown up in both cities. Dalou’s preferred method was modelling in terracotta, which enabled a uid handling of material evident in the sketch-like rendering of Wynne’s dress, and her sensitively observed features. His approach and teaching later had a major impact on the younger generation of British sculptors. London Terracotta(2021)
Object history
Purchased by Mr David Lane from the North London Auction House in about 1983 for around £160. Displayed in his lighting and decor shop Home Lights in Berwick Street London, Soho, where it was purchased by the Display Manager of Maple & Co for around £220. Purchased by the Museum from Maple & Co, London in 1984 for £535.
Production
Eugénie Maria Wynne (b. about 1827)
Subjects depicted
Summary
This bust of Eugénie Maria Wynne ((1827–1899) was one of a number of portraits kept at the Wynne family's house, Garthewin in Denbighshire, North Wales. On the death of her grandson, who inherited the estate from an uncle, the house was sold and the portraits it contained (with the exception of this bust) were lent to the National Library of Wales, Cardiff. This bust was exhibited at the Society of French Artists, London, in 1875, soon after its execution. Its location was unknown until its appearance in London in the 1980s. A painted plaster cast of it was recently acquired by the National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. Eugénie's eldest brother, Eyre Crowe (1824-1910), trained as an artist in Paris under Paul Delaroche (1797-1856). Crowe's portrait of her is currently on loan to the National Library of Wales, Cardiff. In 1867 he was appointed one of the 13 Art Referees at the South Kensington Museum, following the departure of J. C. Robinson. Another brother, Sir Joseph Archer Crowe, was the art historian who published prolifically in collaboration with G. B. Cavalcaselle.



Dalou (1838-1902) was the son of a glove maker and initially trained in drawing at the Petit École in Paris. There he was encouraged to do sculpture. In 1854 he entered the École des Beaux-Arts, where he trained for four years. He was known for his left-wing political sympathies and was involved in the establishment of the Paris Commune in 1871. After his overthrow he was forced into exile in London, where he lived from 1871 until his return to Paris in 1879. In London he frequently exhibited at the Royal Academy and he was given a teaching appointment at the National Art Training School in South Kensington (later the Royal College of Art), where he had a profound effect on the development of British sculpture.
Bibliographic References
  • Bilbey, Diane with Trusted, Marjorie, British Sculpture 1470 to 2000. A Concise Catalogue of the Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2002, p. 244, cat. no. 369
  • Wilson, David, 'The rediscovered Mr Gladstone goes home. A bust of the statesman by Joseph Edgar Boehm', in: The British Art Journal, VII, no. 3, note 54 on p. 28
  • Dreyfous, M., Dalou: Sa Vie et son Oevre, Paris, 1903, pp. 67-8
  • Lami, S., Dictionnaire des Sculpteurs de l’Ecole Française au Dix-Neuvième Siècle, II, Paris, 1916, p. 7
  • Caillaux, H., Aimé-Jules Dalou (1838-1902), Paris, 1935, p. 130
Collection
Accession Number
A.2-1984

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record createdFebruary 26, 2003
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