Not currently on display at the V&A

Byzance

Evening Dress
1924 (designed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This sleeveless dress has a low square neckline, which was popular in the the mid 1920s. Its straight bodice is embroidered with a design that reveals the influence of Egyptian patterns. Jean Patou (1880-1936) was born in Normandy, France, the son of a tanner. His uncle owned a fur business, which Patou joined. In 1914 he opened a small dressmaking business, Maison Parry, in Paris and sold his entire opening collection to an American buyer. His career was interrupted by the First World War of 1914-1918, but in 1919 he reopened his salon, this time under his own name. His collections continued to be a great success. Along with 'Coco' Chanel he was considered a leading exponent of the 'garçon' look, creating smart, workmanlike and well-tailored clothes. Throughout the 1920s he also consistently championed the shorter length of skirt that did much to stimulate the demand for stockings. His long-waisted evening dresses with their emphasis on luxurious design and rich decoration were worn by famous actresses, such as Louise Brooks, Constance Bennett and Mary Pickford. Patou died in 1936, and his brother-in-law, Raymond Barbàs, took over the business. In 1963 the artistic direction of the company was taken over by Michael Goma.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silk, embroidered with glass bugle beads and imitation baroque pearls, lined with georgette and fastened with metal hooks and eyes
Brief Description
Evening Dress, Patou, Paris, 1924.
Physical Description
Evening dress made from oyster georgette with low, straight neck and shoulder straps. The bodice is straight cut with a low waist. The skirt is slightly gauged at the back and continues to the front sides. The front skirt consists of a central beaded panel. The dress is embroidered in beads of pink, gold, bronze and baroque pearl. The design entirely covers the bodice and is arranged in panels with floral motifs and a border pattern around the skirt. The shoulder straps and front skirt panel are embroidered in bands. The dress fastens at the left hand side with hooks and eyes and is lined with georgette.
Dimensions
  • Length: 110cm (Note: maximum length)
  • Width: 42cm (Note: width at hips)
Credit line
Given by Lord and Lady Cowdray
Summary
This sleeveless dress has a low square neckline, which was popular in the the mid 1920s. Its straight bodice is embroidered with a design that reveals the influence of Egyptian patterns. Jean Patou (1880-1936) was born in Normandy, France, the son of a tanner. His uncle owned a fur business, which Patou joined. In 1914 he opened a small dressmaking business, Maison Parry, in Paris and sold his entire opening collection to an American buyer. His career was interrupted by the First World War of 1914-1918, but in 1919 he reopened his salon, this time under his own name. His collections continued to be a great success. Along with 'Coco' Chanel he was considered a leading exponent of the 'garçon' look, creating smart, workmanlike and well-tailored clothes. Throughout the 1920s he also consistently championed the shorter length of skirt that did much to stimulate the demand for stockings. His long-waisted evening dresses with their emphasis on luxurious design and rich decoration were worn by famous actresses, such as Louise Brooks, Constance Bennett and Mary Pickford. Patou died in 1936, and his brother-in-law, Raymond Barbàs, took over the business. In 1963 the artistic direction of the company was taken over by Michael Goma.
Collection
Accession Number
T.198-1970

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record createdFebruary 25, 2003
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