Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
China, Room 44, The T.T. Tsui Gallery

Relief

1115-1234 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This marble slab probably came from north China, to judge from the costumes of the figures and the tent that is similar to a Mongol yurt. These, together with the evidence of a complete tomb lined with such slabs excavated in the north-western province of Gansu, show that the slab probably originated in Jin dynasty territory. This state was established by a different ethnic group from the majority Han Chinese. The complete set of slabs probably depicted popular Confucian tales later known as the 'Twenty Four Exemplars of Filial Piety'. It was during this period that this set of tales was being structured, and it often inspired tomb decoration. Support for Confucian values was important to ruling groups not themselves Han Chinese, striving to cement their legitimacy as holders of the Mandate of Heaven.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Marble, carved in shallow relief
Brief Description
Marble slab from the wall of a tomb chamber, Jin dynasty (1115-1234), Chinese.
Physical Description
Marble slab carved in low-relief with two figures seated beneath a tree in the top register and figures with cups seated inside a tent watching two musicians in the lower register. The stone is a white marble of a large crystal size, large enough to be seen with the naked eye.
Dimensions
  • Height: 124cm
Style
Credit line
Purchased with Art Fund support, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
Summary
This marble slab probably came from north China, to judge from the costumes of the figures and the tent that is similar to a Mongol yurt. These, together with the evidence of a complete tomb lined with such slabs excavated in the north-western province of Gansu, show that the slab probably originated in Jin dynasty territory. This state was established by a different ethnic group from the majority Han Chinese. The complete set of slabs probably depicted popular Confucian tales later known as the 'Twenty Four Exemplars of Filial Piety'. It was during this period that this set of tales was being structured, and it often inspired tomb decoration. Support for Confucian values was important to ruling groups not themselves Han Chinese, striving to cement their legitimacy as holders of the Mandate of Heaven.
Collection
Accession Number
A.59-1937

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record createdFebruary 9, 2003
Record URL