Salt Cellar thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sculpture, Room 111, The Gilbert Bayes Gallery

Salt Cellar

ca. 1560 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Bronzes often exist in a number of versions, made over many decades or even centuries. This is achieved through a variety of means, such as changes in the wax, new moulds taken from an existing bronze or the reuse of the existing model.With bronze a model could easily be reproduced and adapted. The original model for this salt cellar has been attributed to the important Veronese sculptor Girolamo Campagna (1549–1626), but it may have been created in one of the Venetian foundries. The shape made it easy to pick up and pass around a group of diners. The model became very popular and was frequently reproduced over the following centuries.

Girolamo Campagna (1549-1626) was one of the most important sculptors working in Venice and the surrounding region in the late 16th century and the early 17th. Although his older rival Alessandro Vittoria was a more versatile artist, Campagna’s talents centred on a remarkable gift for religious statuary. In this he was unrivalled in Venice and scarcely equalled elsewhere in Italy. Among his most impressive achievements are the high altars for the Venetian churches of Il Redentore and S Giorgio Maggiore. His brother Giuseppe Campagna (d 1626) was also a sculptor and assisted him.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gilt bronze
Brief Description
Salt cellar, gilt bronze, male figure supporting a shell, Italian (Venice), about 1560
Physical Description
Gilt bronze salt cellar formed by a male figure kneeling and suppporting a clam shell.
Dimensions
  • Height: 21cm
  • Length: 15cm
  • Width: 13cm
Object history
Bought from the Soulages Collection in 1865 for £10.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Bronzes often exist in a number of versions, made over many decades or even centuries. This is achieved through a variety of means, such as changes in the wax, new moulds taken from an existing bronze or the reuse of the existing model.With bronze a model could easily be reproduced and adapted. The original model for this salt cellar has been attributed to the important Veronese sculptor Girolamo Campagna (1549–1626), but it may have been created in one of the Venetian foundries. The shape made it easy to pick up and pass around a group of diners. The model became very popular and was frequently reproduced over the following centuries.



Girolamo Campagna (1549-1626) was one of the most important sculptors working in Venice and the surrounding region in the late 16th century and the early 17th. Although his older rival Alessandro Vittoria was a more versatile artist, Campagna’s talents centred on a remarkable gift for religious statuary. In this he was unrivalled in Venice and scarcely equalled elsewhere in Italy. Among his most impressive achievements are the high altars for the Venetian churches of Il Redentore and S Giorgio Maggiore. His brother Giuseppe Campagna (d 1626) was also a sculptor and assisted him.
Associated Object
628-1865 (Set)
Bibliographic References
  • Robinson, John Charles. Catalogue of the Soulages Collection. London: Chapman & Hall, 1856, p. 124
  • Inventory of Art Objects acquired in the Year 1865. Inventory of the Objects in the Art Division of the Museum at South Kensington, arranged According to the Dates of their Acquisition. Vol. 1. London : Printed by George E. Eyre and William Spottiswoode for H.M.S.O., 1868, p. 53
  • Treml, Manfred (ed.) Salz Macht Geschichte, Augsburg : Haus der Bayerischen Geschichte, 1995RO 106 a
Collection
Accession Number
629-1865

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record createdJanuary 22, 2003
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