A Milleners Shop thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 120, The Wolfson Galleries

A Milleners Shop

Glass Coloured Print
1772 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This is a glass print, sometimes called a glass picture. Its maker had to soak a black and white print in water, stick it face down onto the back of a sheet of glass, rub most of the paper away from the back leaving a thin transparent layer of paper and the ink making the image. The next stage was to colour the image from the back in oil colours. This was then fitted into a frame and the buyer could then hang it up on his or her wall straight away.

Trading
Much of the appeal of glass prints to 18th-century shoppers was their relative cheapness compared to framed oil of watercolour paintings, which were entirely painted by hand. Glass prints were clearly made on a commercial basis, because certain prints on paper are regularly found turned into glass prints.

Time
English writers of artists' manuals describe how to make glass prints from the 1680s onwards. This print dates from the period of their greatest popularity - from about 1760 to 1790.

Frames & Condition
The person who made this glass print chose a frame made out of moulded pine, painted black, and gilded at the inner and outer edges. 18th-century glass prints in their original frames are quite rare. Because the print is stuck to the back of the glass, if the glass gets cracked or broken, it cannot be replaced.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Mezzotint, transferred to glass and hand coloured, in a pine moulded frame painted black with gilded sight edge and outer border
Brief Description
A Milleners (sic) Shop or Mrs Monopolize, the Butchers Wife purchasing a Modern Head Dress; British 1722
Physical Description
Glass print depicting a woman in a milliner's shop, trying on an elaborate headpiece.
Dimensions
  • Frame height: 42.1cm
  • Frame width: 31.8cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 15/09/1999 by RK/KN
Marks and Inscriptions
  • A Milleners (sic) Shop or Mrs Monopolize, the Butchers Wife purchasing a Modern Head Dress (Lettered)
  • Publishd April 9th 1772, by W. Humphrey, St Martins Lane. (Lettered)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This satirical print shows Mrs Monopolise, the butcher's wife, purchasing a modern head-dress. It mocks both the absurdity of the head-dress and the social pretensions of the purchaser. Glass prints, like hats, were among the luxury goods that could be viewed and chosen in London shops.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Teddy Dawe
Object history
RP No. 96/1175.



By an unknown artist using a mezzotint published by W. Humphrey, London
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This is a glass print, sometimes called a glass picture. Its maker had to soak a black and white print in water, stick it face down onto the back of a sheet of glass, rub most of the paper away from the back leaving a thin transparent layer of paper and the ink making the image. The next stage was to colour the image from the back in oil colours. This was then fitted into a frame and the buyer could then hang it up on his or her wall straight away.

Trading
Much of the appeal of glass prints to 18th-century shoppers was their relative cheapness compared to framed oil of watercolour paintings, which were entirely painted by hand. Glass prints were clearly made on a commercial basis, because certain prints on paper are regularly found turned into glass prints.

Time
English writers of artists' manuals describe how to make glass prints from the 1680s onwards. This print dates from the period of their greatest popularity - from about 1760 to 1790.

Frames & Condition
The person who made this glass print chose a frame made out of moulded pine, painted black, and gilded at the inner and outer edges. 18th-century glass prints in their original frames are quite rare. Because the print is stuck to the back of the glass, if the glass gets cracked or broken, it cannot be replaced.
Bibliographic References
  • British Museum: Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires. London, 1870-1954, 4775
  • Pason, G. Social Caricature in the Eighteenth Century. London, 1905, Pl. cxcviii
Collection
Accession Number
E.620-1997

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record createdJanuary 20, 2003
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