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Stringed Instrument (Sarinda)

19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This sarinda would originally have had four gut strings and a number of sympathetic wires – additional strings to give extra resonance – made of brass. The hollow body is of wood inlaid with ivory, the belly half covered with parchment chamfered or pared away (the chief characteristic of this kind of instrument). The sarinda is held with the left hand and rests against the performer’s body with the neck at the top resting on the left shoulder. The bow is held in the right hand with an underhand grip similar to that used by an Elizabethan viol player. An almost identical sarinda is in the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, and the inlaid decoration is typical of 19th-century work from Hoshiarpur in north-west India.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Stringed Instrument
  • Bow (Chordophone Component)
Materials and techniques
Teak and ivory
Brief description
Sarinda (stringed instrument); teak and ivory; Punjab, India; 19th century.
Physical description
Sarinda (stringed instrument); teak and ivory. Four gut strings and a number of sympathetic wires made of brass. The hollow is of wood inlaid with ivory, the belly is half covered with parchment pared away.
Dimensions
  • Length: 65cm
  • Width: 27cm
  • Depth: 26cm (maximum)
  • Depth: 23cm (at lower end)
  • Length: 59cm (of bow IM.67:A-1911)
Gallery label
SARINDA AND BOW Teak with ivory and lac inlay, parchment, gut and metal strings; the bow wood, ivory, textile, string and horsehair Possibly Hoshiarpur, Punjab 1800-1900 IM.67-1911 Given by Mrs R. Irvine (15/09/2015)
Credit line
Given by Mrs R. Irvine
Object history
Given by Mrs R. Irvine
Summary
This sarinda would originally have had four gut strings and a number of sympathetic wires – additional strings to give extra resonance – made of brass. The hollow body is of wood inlaid with ivory, the belly half covered with parchment chamfered or pared away (the chief characteristic of this kind of instrument). The sarinda is held with the left hand and rests against the performer’s body with the neck at the top resting on the left shoulder. The bow is held in the right hand with an underhand grip similar to that used by an Elizabethan viol player. An almost identical sarinda is in the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, and the inlaid decoration is typical of 19th-century work from Hoshiarpur in north-west India.
Bibliographic references
  • Stronge, S. (Ed.) "The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms", V&A, 1999p. 44, Pl. 42 and p.239, Cat. 216
  • A similar example in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, is published in Bor, Joep and Bruguière, Philippe (eds.). Gloire des princes, louange des dieux : patrimoine musical de l'Hindoustan du XIVe au XXe siècle. Paris : Musée de la musique : Réunion des musées nationaux, 2003. ISBN 2711846687 ; 9782711846689. p. 121 cat. no. 63.
Collection
Accession number
IM.67&A-1911

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Record createdJanuary 2, 2003
Record URL
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