Dressing Rooms at Whitehall

Print
1953 (printed and published)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This print was one of a portfolio by various artists commissioned by the Royal College of Art, London, to celebrate the coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953. Minton was a painter, but recognised as an illustrator and printmaker too. His preferred medium was lithography, which he felt was closer to painting than any other graphic medium. This intimate view of a guardsman's private life indirectly reflects Minton's homosexuality. Guardsmen were popular figures of attraction for upper- and middle-class gay men in the 1950s, and they gained a reputation for availability. As with many of Minton's portraits, this print draws on his fascination with the 'manly ideal'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour lithograph on paper
Brief Description
'Horse Guards in their Dressing Rooms at Whitehall', colour lithograph by John Minton, 1953
Physical Description
Colour Lithograph on paper printed in yellow, red and black on white ground. A guardsman seated on his bed in his barracks combing his busby helmet, hanging on brick wall behind him a red guardsman's jacket and a yellow cape or shirt, various bits of toiletry equipment and a pair of boots are spread out on the bed.
Dimensions
  • Printed surface height: 42.4cm
  • Printed surface width: 30.4cm
  • Sheet height: 56.1cm
  • Sheet width: 38.3cm
Style
Production typeLimited edition
Marks and Inscriptions
John Minton (1) Signature; pencil)
Credit line
Given by the Royal College of Art
Production
Printed and published to mark the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, 1953.



Attribution note: One of a portfolio published by the Royal College of Art to mark the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

Reason For Production: Commission
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
This print was one of a portfolio by various artists commissioned by the Royal College of Art, London, to celebrate the coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953. Minton was a painter, but recognised as an illustrator and printmaker too. His preferred medium was lithography, which he felt was closer to painting than any other graphic medium. This intimate view of a guardsman's private life indirectly reflects Minton's homosexuality. Guardsmen were popular figures of attraction for upper- and middle-class gay men in the 1950s, and they gained a reputation for availability. As with many of Minton's portraits, this print draws on his fascination with the 'manly ideal'.
Associated Objects
Bibliographic Reference
Taken from Departmental Circulation Register 1953
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.329-1953

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record createdDecember 15, 2002
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