The Kabuki Actor Ichikawa Omezo I in the drama Shibaraku thumbnail 1
The Kabuki Actor Ichikawa Omezo I in the drama Shibaraku thumbnail 2
+3
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F , Case TOPIC, Shelf JP, Box 1

The Kabuki Actor Ichikawa Omezo I in the drama Shibaraku

Woodblock Print
ca. 1810 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a nishiki-e (brocade print), so called because its rich palette of colours is likened to nishiki or silk brocades. It is most likely the depiction of a production performed at the Morita-za Theatre in November 1810. The bold graphic stylisation and abstraction of form in prints such as this exerted a great influence on European artists. The South Kensington Museum (now the V&A) acquired a major collection of Japanese prints in 1886, making a large body of these images available to artists and a wider public for the first time.
read Japanese woodblock prints (ukiyo-e) Produced in their many thousands and hugely popular during the Edo period (1615 – 1868), these colourful woodblock prints, known as ukiyo-e, depicted scenes from everyday Japan.
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour print from woodblocks
Brief Description
Print by Toyokuni: 'The Kabuki Actor Ichikawa Omezo I in the Drama "Shibaraku" ', Japanese, ca. 1810
Physical Description
From 'Masterpieces of Japanese Prints', p.143 (V&A,1991):

This is most likely a depiction from a production at the Morita-za Theatre in November 1910. In the Meiji period (1868-1912) the script of the play 'Shibaraku' (Wait!) became fixed and the name of the main character was designated as Kamakura no Gongoro Kamemasa. Originally, the plot and the characters were created anew each time it was performed. Virtuous men and women, about to be cut down by an evil lord and his servants are saved by a man with superhuman strength. When this hero appears on stage, he utters the words 'Wait! Wait!' which at first was the only part of the play which was fixed.

Oban size. Signature: Toyokuni ga
Summary
This is a nishiki-e (brocade print), so called because its rich palette of colours is likened to nishiki or silk brocades. It is most likely the depiction of a production performed at the Morita-za Theatre in November 1810. The bold graphic stylisation and abstraction of form in prints such as this exerted a great influence on European artists. The South Kensington Museum (now the V&A) acquired a major collection of Japanese prints in 1886, making a large body of these images available to artists and a wider public for the first time.
Collection
Accession Number
E.4829-1886

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record createdDecember 8, 2002
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