Plate thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 139, The Curtain Foundation Gallery

Plate

1790-1792 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This plate is from the 'Hope' service, made for the Duke of Clarence in 1792. The Derby factory made strenuous efforts to poach this prestigious commission from the Worcester porcelain factory. John Pennington, who painted the central subject on this plate in monochrome enamels, was Worcester's finest painter during the late 1700s. He began his apprenticeship with Wedgwood in London in 1784 at the comparatively late age of eighteen. This explains why he was apprenticed for three years rather than the usual seven. Perhaps exceptionally, he was 'allowed one hour each day for the purpose of improving himself in drawing'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with underglaze blue, enamels and gilded
Brief Description
Plate in soft-paste porcelain painted with underglaze blue, enamels and gilded, painted by John Pennington, Worcester porcelain factory, Worcester, 1790-1792.
Physical Description
Plate in soft-paste porcelain painted with underglaze blue, enamels and gilded. In the middle is a medallion with a female figure of Hope with an anchor watching a ship in the distant. Border of classical architectural motives in gold on a blue enamel ground.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 24.4cm
Marks and Inscriptions
A crescent under 'Flight' under a crown (In underglaze blue)
Credit line
Given by the Rev. A. Duanne Pell
Production
From the 'Hope' service made for the Duke of Clarence in 1792.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This plate is from the 'Hope' service, made for the Duke of Clarence in 1792. The Derby factory made strenuous efforts to poach this prestigious commission from the Worcester porcelain factory. John Pennington, who painted the central subject on this plate in monochrome enamels, was Worcester's finest painter during the late 1700s. He began his apprenticeship with Wedgwood in London in 1784 at the comparatively late age of eighteen. This explains why he was apprenticed for three years rather than the usual seven. Perhaps exceptionally, he was 'allowed one hour each day for the purpose of improving himself in drawing'.
Bibliographic Reference
Young, Hilary. English Porcelain, 1745-95. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1999. 229p., ill. ISBN 1851772820.
Collection
Accession Number
C.990-1922

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record createdDecember 3, 2002
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