Nawab Sikander Jah

Painting
ca. 1810 (made)
Nawab Sikander Jah thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Following the death of the emperor Aurangzeb, the Mughal empire began to fall apart and regional courts gradually developed their own artistic identities. During the reign of the emperor Muhammad Shah (1719-48) a noble of the court called Nizam al-Mulk became disillusioned by the prevailing anarchy and in 1724 left for the Deccan. Within a year he had brought the whole of the Mughal-ruled Deccan under his control and the following year was given the title of Asaf Jah and the right to independent rule by the emperor. This portrait depicts Nawab Sikandar Jah, one of his successors, who ruled from 1803-1829, giving audience to four ministers, and was done in Hyderabad in about 1810.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Painted in opaque watercolour on paper
Brief Description
Painting, Nawab Sikander Jah, Nizam of Hyderabad, opaque watercolour on paper, Hyderabad, ca. 1810
Physical Description
Painting, in opaque watercolour on paper, Nawab Sikander Jah, the Nizam of Hyderabad (1803-1829) having a meeting with four ministers. A nizam is one of a line of sovereigns of Hyderabad, reigning from 1713 to 1950. He is shown with his jewellery, richly decorated dagger and sword, all emblems of his position.
Content description
Nawab Sikander Jah, the Nizam of Hyderabad (1803-1829) having a meeting with four ministers. He is shown with his jewellery, richly decorated dagger and sword, all emblems of his position
Styles
Object history
Jackson, Anna and Jaffer, Amin (eds), with Deepika Ahlawat. Maharaja : the splendour of India's royal courts. London, V&A Publishing, 2009. ISBN.9781851775736 (hbk.), ISBN.1851775730 (hbk.).
Subjects depicted
Summary
Following the death of the emperor Aurangzeb, the Mughal empire began to fall apart and regional courts gradually developed their own artistic identities. During the reign of the emperor Muhammad Shah (1719-48) a noble of the court called Nizam al-Mulk became disillusioned by the prevailing anarchy and in 1724 left for the Deccan. Within a year he had brought the whole of the Mughal-ruled Deccan under his control and the following year was given the title of Asaf Jah and the right to independent rule by the emperor. This portrait depicts Nawab Sikandar Jah, one of his successors, who ruled from 1803-1829, giving audience to four ministers, and was done in Hyderabad in about 1810.
Bibliographic References
  • Plate 62, page 84.Swallow, Deborah and John Guy eds. Arts of India: 1550-1900. text by Rosemary Crill, John Guy, Veronica Murphy, Susan Stronge and Deborah Swallow. London : V&A Publications, 1990. 240 p., ill. ISBN 1851770224, pp.120/121, pl.102.
  • Jackson, Anna and Ji Wei (eds.) with Rosemary Crill, Ainsley M. Cameron and Nicholas Barnard, compiled by the Palace Museum, translated by Yuan Hong, Qi Yue and Liu Ran. The Splendour of India' Royal Courts : Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum. Beijing: the Forbidden City Publishing House, 2013. Text in English and Chinese. ISBN 9787513403917.pps. 34 and 35
  • Swallow, D., Stronge, S., Crill, R., Koezuka, T., editor and translator, "The Art of the Indian Courts. Miniature Painting and Decorative Arts", Victoria & Albert Museum and NHK Kinki Media Plan, 1993.p. 99, cat. no. 83
Collection
Accession Number
IS.107-1951

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record createdDecember 2, 2002
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