Plate

1510 (made)
Plate thumbnail 1
Plate thumbnail 2
+3
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

During the Renaissance a distinction was drawn between fine art and the decorative arts. Maiolica painters were regarded as artisans who copied or freely followed printed sources or designs provided by major artists, but some regarded themselves as artists in their own right and signed their work. This dish shows a maiolica painter at work, magnificently dressed and watched by wealthy patrons. It was made at Cafaggiolo, a small potters' workshop set up in the grounds of a Medici villa near Florence to satisfy the needs of its aristocratic owners. It was probably painted by Maestro Jacopo, one of the most skilled maiolica painters of his time, here clearly making a statement about his aspirations as a fine artist and about his noble patronage.
It was once mistakenly thought that the artist shown was Raphael (1483-1520), painting a maiolica dish for his important patrons.
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object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware, painted in colours
Brief Description
Tin-glazed earthenware dish (maiolica) painted in colours with an artist decorating a plate, Cafaggiolo, about 1510.
Physical Description
Tin-glazed earthenware dish (maiolica) painted in colours with an artist decorating a plate, marked 'SP' in monogram crossed by a paraph.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 23.9cm
Historical context
During the Renaissance a distinction was drawn between fine art and the decorative arts. Maiolica painters were regarded as artisans who copied or freely followed printed sources or designs provided by major artists, but some regarded themselves as artists in their own right and signed their work. This dish shows a maiolica painter at work, magnificently dressed and watched by wealthy patrons. It was made at Cafaggiolo, a small potters' workshop set up in the grounds of a Medici villa near Florence to satisfy the needs of its aristocratic owners. It was probably painted by Maestro Jacopo, one of the most skilled maiolica painters of his time, here clearly making a statement about his aspirations as a fine artist and about his noble patronage.
Summary
During the Renaissance a distinction was drawn between fine art and the decorative arts. Maiolica painters were regarded as artisans who copied or freely followed printed sources or designs provided by major artists, but some regarded themselves as artists in their own right and signed their work. This dish shows a maiolica painter at work, magnificently dressed and watched by wealthy patrons. It was made at Cafaggiolo, a small potters' workshop set up in the grounds of a Medici villa near Florence to satisfy the needs of its aristocratic owners. It was probably painted by Maestro Jacopo, one of the most skilled maiolica painters of his time, here clearly making a statement about his aspirations as a fine artist and about his noble patronage.

It was once mistakenly thought that the artist shown was Raphael (1483-1520), painting a maiolica dish for his important patrons.
Bibliographic References
  • Hildyard, Robin. European Ceramics. London : V&A Publications, 1999. 144 p., ill. ISBN 185177260X
  • Liefkes, Reino and Hilary Young eds. Masterpieces of World Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum London: V&A Publishing, 2008. p.64
  • Baker, Malcolm, and Brenda Richardson (eds.), A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: V&A Publications, 1999.
Collection
Accession Number
1717-1855

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record createdNovember 25, 2002
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