Crucified Christ thumbnail 1
Crucified Christ thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Europe 1600-1815, Room 7, The Sheikha Amna Bint Mohammed Al Thani Gallery

Crucified Christ

Statuette
ca. 1650 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This small crucifix is a devotional object, one perhaps used by Spanish missionaries in South America, or possibly in the Philippines, during the time the Spanish were in power there. It could alternatively have been made in Spain itself, although the form of the loincloth is reminiscent of those seen in carved ivores made in the Philippines when it was under Spanish rule. The facial features and form of the body suggest it dates from the mid-17th century. The fact that the figure is of lead means that it was cast from a mould, so that several copies could be made. The paint and inserted glass droplets would be applied subsequently. The glass droplets representing blood recall the moulded glass tears sometimes seen on the cheeks of baroque wood busts of the Sorrowing Virgin made in Spain.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Painted lead, with inset glass globules, imitating drops of blood.
Brief description
The crucified Christ.
Physical description
The crucified Christ is shown with his head resting on his right shoulder. The original cross is now lost. Stauette of painted lead with inset glass droplets.
Dimensions
  • Height: 33.6cm
  • Widest point (hand to hand) width: 195mm
  • Widest point depth: 65mm
Gallery label
The Crucified Christ About 1650 Missionaries and Christian emigrants in the Spanish colonies needed devotional images for church and private use. This lead figure was cast from a mould, from which further copies would have been made. Christ’s skin has been painted a pale colour, which probably imitates the carved ivory prototypes that inspired the figure. It also highlights his vividly painted wounds, which glisten realistically with applied glass droplets. Spain or the Philippines Painted lead, inset with glass Bequeathed by Lt-Col. Croft-Lyons(09.12.2015)
Object history
Bequeathed in 1926 by Lieut. Col. Croft-Lyons.
Subject depicted
Summary
This small crucifix is a devotional object, one perhaps used by Spanish missionaries in South America, or possibly in the Philippines, during the time the Spanish were in power there. It could alternatively have been made in Spain itself, although the form of the loincloth is reminiscent of those seen in carved ivores made in the Philippines when it was under Spanish rule. The facial features and form of the body suggest it dates from the mid-17th century. The fact that the figure is of lead means that it was cast from a mould, so that several copies could be made. The paint and inserted glass droplets would be applied subsequently. The glass droplets representing blood recall the moulded glass tears sometimes seen on the cheeks of baroque wood busts of the Sorrowing Virgin made in Spain.
Bibliographic reference
Trusted, Marjorie. Spanish Sculpture : Catalogue of the Post-Medieval Spanish Sculpture in Wood, Terracotta, Alabaster, Marble, Stone, Lead and Jet in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1996. pp. 137-138. cat. no. 65 and pl. 22.
Collection
Accession number
A.68-1926

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Record createdNovember 14, 2002
Record URL
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