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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case GG, Shelf 66
This object, or the text that describes it, is deemed offensive and discriminatory. We are committed to improving our records, and work is ongoing.


Print

18th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

By the early 18th century, images of black men and women had become quite common on trade signs hanging outside shops and inns and on business cards. Portraits were known as 'Blackamoors' heads'. This example is typical of the genre. Images of black people were particularly associated with luxury imports from abroad, such as tea, coffee and chocolate, which are mentioned on this card. Tobacco and sugar, which were planted and harvested by African slaves forced to labour in Britain's American colonies and in the West Indian plantations established by Europeans, also often feature on similar cards.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraving
Brief Description
Trade card, Grocer's trade card showing black figure
Physical Description
Trade card showing a framed black woman's head.
Dimensions1/4 Imperal portrait
Marks and Inscriptions
M:Lycett / AT THE / Blackmoors Head in Tyler Street, / near Major Fouberts Passage, / Carnaby Market, / LONDON. / Sells all sorts of fine Teas, / Coffee, Chocolate.
Object history
NB. While the term 'blackamoor' has been used in this record, it has since fallen from usage and is now considered offensive. The term is repeated in this record in its original historical context.
Summary
By the early 18th century, images of black men and women had become quite common on trade signs hanging outside shops and inns and on business cards. Portraits were known as 'Blackamoors' heads'. This example is typical of the genre. Images of black people were particularly associated with luxury imports from abroad, such as tea, coffee and chocolate, which are mentioned on this card. Tobacco and sugar, which were planted and harvested by African slaves forced to labour in Britain's American colonies and in the West Indian plantations established by Europeans, also often feature on similar cards.
Collection
Accession Number
12851:11

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record createdNovember 12, 2002
Record URL