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Panel - Winter

Winter

  • Object:

    Panel

  • Place of origin:

    Netherlands (painted)

  • Date:

    early 17th century (painted)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Stained glass

  • Credit Line:

    Purchased through the Bequest of Captain H. B. Murray

  • Museum number:

    C.397-1923

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

The images on this panel and on those of C.396-1923 were copied from a series of engravings depicting the Four Seasons by Adriaen Collaert (c.1560-1618). Collaert based these engravings on designs by another Netherlandish artist, Martin de Vos (1531-1603). Stained glass workshops in the 17th century often made use of readily available printed material as designs for their stained glass.

On the edges of the panel are zodiacal symbols from the winter months. They are the goat for Capricorn, the water-bearer for Aquarius and two fish for Pisces.

The elderly man in the centre might represent the god Aeolus of Greek mythology. Aeolus was the master of the four winds. He is shown here astride a ball of wind out of which emerge four small blowing faces. They represent the four winds and Aeolus appears to be trying to control them with a bridle he holds in his hands.

Behind him are scenes associated with winter occupations and activities. On the left, a couple slaughter a pig for winter meat. On the right, a man has broken through the ice and is fishing through a hole. There are people skating on the frozen lake.

Physical description

In the centre of the panel is a naked elderly male figure wearing a yellow pointed crown and a cloak that billows around him as if blowing in the wind. He holds a bridle in his hands. Underneath him is a blue ball of air with four small heads representing the four winds. In the background are secenes associated with winter occupations and activities. A family slay a pig on the left of the panel and on the right a man is fishing through a hole in the ice. Behind him are people skating on the ice. Around the edges are three symbols from the zodiac - Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces.

Place of Origin

Netherlands (painted)

Date

early 17th century (painted)

Materials and Techniques

Stained glass

Dimensions

Length: 11 in, Width: 8.5 in

Historical context note

The images on this panel and on those of C.396-1923 were copied from a series of engravings depicting the Four Seasons by Adriaen Collaert (c.1560-1618). Collaert based these engravings on designs by another Netherlandish artist, Martin de Vos (1531-1603). Stained glass workshops in the 17th century often made use of readily-available printed material as designs for their stained glass.

The figure of the elderly man in the centre might represent the god Aeolus of Greek mythology. Aeolus was the master of the four winds. He is shown here astride a ball of wind out of which emerge four small blowing faces. They represent the four winds and Aeolus appears to be trying to control them with a bridle he holds in his hands.

Behind him are scenes associated with winter occupations and activities. On the left a couple slaughter a pig for winter meat. On the right, a man has broken through the ice and is fishing through a hole. There are people skating on the frozen lake.

On the edges of this panel are zodiacal symbols from the winter months. They are the goat for Capricorn, the water-bearer for Aquarius and two fish for Pisces. The whole composition is emblematic of Winter.

Descriptive line

Panel of glass painted in enamel colours and yellow (silver) stain. Depicting a male figure representing the season of winter. Netherlands, early 17thc.

Production Note

After a design by Martin de Vos and an engraving by Adriaen Collaert.

Subjects depicted

Winter

Categories

Stained Glass; Religion

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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