Virgin & Child thumbnail 1
Virgin & Child thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sculpture 1300-1600, Room 27

Virgin & Child

Statuette
1536 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The inscription on the front of the base reads: M.D.?AMBRS TAIAPREDA DI MAZOLIS/ XXXVI. The word 'Taiapreda' is a Venetian dialect form of the Italian 'Tagliapietra', meaning stone-cutter. The sculptor may be identical with one bearing the same first name who received payment in May 1524 for work on the Scuola di Dan Rocco, one of the main religious confraternities in Venice. The statue may have formed the centre of a more extensive group, and the gaze of both Virgin and Child was probably directed towards figures of donors who wuld have commissioned and paid for the work. The marble is weathered and was probably situated on the outside of a building, perhaps in a lunette above a doorway.


Object details
Object type
Materials and techniques
Marble
Brief description
Statuette in marble, 'Virgin & Child', by Ambrogio di Mazolis, 1536, Italian
Physical description
The Virgin is shown seated in a frontal pose, with her knees apart and her left hand held across her body, looking downwards to her left. With her right arm she supports the child, who stands on her right knee grasping an orb or apple in his hands.
Dimensions
  • Height: 78.7cm
  • Weight: 127kg
Marks and inscriptions
M.D. AMBRS TAIAPREDA DI MAZOLIS XXXVI (Inscription; decoration; On the front of the base; 1536)
Gallery label
The Virgin and Child 1536 Ambrogio di Mazolis (active 1524–36) As the marble is weathered, this sculpture was probably once placed on the outside of a building, forming the central element of a larger group. The sculptor may be the ‘Ambrogio’ who was paid in May 1524 for work on the Scuola di San Rocco, one of the main religious confraternities in Venice. Italy, Venice Marble Inscribed with the sculptor’s name and the date Museum no. 1815-1892(26/11/2010)
Object history
The statue may have formed the centre of a more extensive group, and the gaze of both the Virgin and Child are probably directed towards the figures of the donors who would have commissioned and paid for the work. The marble is weathered and was probably situated on the outside of a building.
Historical context
The inscription on the front of the base reads: M.D./AMBRS TAIAPREDA DI MAZOLIS/XXXVI. The word 'Taiapreda@ is a Venetian dialect form of the Italian 'Tagliapietra', meaning stone-cutter. The sculptor may be identical with one bearing the same first name who received payment in May 1524 for work on the Scuola di San Rocco, one of the main religious confraternities in Venice
Subjects depicted
Summary
The inscription on the front of the base reads: M.D.?AMBRS TAIAPREDA DI MAZOLIS/ XXXVI. The word 'Taiapreda' is a Venetian dialect form of the Italian 'Tagliapietra', meaning stone-cutter. The sculptor may be identical with one bearing the same first name who received payment in May 1524 for work on the Scuola di Dan Rocco, one of the main religious confraternities in Venice. The statue may have formed the centre of a more extensive group, and the gaze of both Virgin and Child was probably directed towards figures of donors who wuld have commissioned and paid for the work. The marble is weathered and was probably situated on the outside of a building, perhaps in a lunette above a doorway.
Bibliographic references
  • List of Objects in the Art Division South Kensington Museum acquired during the Year 1892. Arranged according to the dates of acquisition, with appendix and indices. London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1893. pp. 228
  • MacLagan, E, and Longhurst, Margaret, H. Catalogue of Italian Sculpture. London: V&A, 1932. pp.104
  • Pope-Hennessy, John. Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: Her Majesty's Stationary Office, 1964. pp.520
Collection
Accession number
1815-1892

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Record createdOctober 28, 2002
Record URL
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