Not currently on display at the V&A

Taper Stand

ca. 1820 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

A taper stand, or wax jack, is a device to hold a turpentined wax taper upright while burning. With this example, the coiled taper is wrapped around the vertical post with one end held in the horizontal snuffers, which are two semi-circular blades. The wax taper was used mainly for melting sealing wax and for lighting candles, tobacco pipes etc., and not as a source of illumination.

Sheffield plate originated, with the discovery in 1742, that bars of silver and copper, in unequal proportions, fused by heating under pressure, could be rolled into sheets of laminated metal and worked like silver. The industry this material created flourished for about 100 years until superseded by electroplating in the 1840s.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Taper Holder
  • Taper
Materials and Techniques
Sheffield plate
Brief Description
English, about 1820.; Sheffield plate



English, about 1820.; Sheffield plate
Physical Description
Taper is quilled around a horizontal cross-bar and passes through a nozzle which is held by two curved supports to one of which is hooked a chained extinguisher. Circular base with angular handle: four ball feet. Decorated with bands of stamped gadroons and shells.
Dimensions
  • Height: 6.75in
  • Diameter: 3in
Style
Production typeMass produced
Credit line
Mrs M. D. Chaplin Gift
Production
Reason For Production: Retail
Summary
A taper stand, or wax jack, is a device to hold a turpentined wax taper upright while burning. With this example, the coiled taper is wrapped around the vertical post with one end held in the horizontal snuffers, which are two semi-circular blades. The wax taper was used mainly for melting sealing wax and for lighting candles, tobacco pipes etc., and not as a source of illumination.



Sheffield plate originated, with the discovery in 1742, that bars of silver and copper, in unequal proportions, fused by heating under pressure, could be rolled into sheets of laminated metal and worked like silver. The industry this material created flourished for about 100 years until superseded by electroplating in the 1840s.
Collection
Accession Number
M.641-1936

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record createdSeptember 17, 2002
Record URL