Tea Kettle and Stand

1880 - 1890 (made)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Silver, Room 67, The Whiteley Galleries
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Christopher Dresser was one of the most talented designers to graduate from the South Kensington, Government School of Design. Unlike Ruskin or Morris, he fully accepted the implications of mechanical production and was always more interested in design than craftsmanship. In 1876, he made his first visit to Japan which had a profound effect on him. Many of his highly original shapes for metalwork arose out of a dual concern for the techniques for mass production and the function of the articles he designed.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 5 parts.

  • Tea Pot
  • Lid
  • Stand
  • Burner
  • Wick Holder
Materials and Techniques
Electroplated nickel silver with ebonised wooden details
Brief Description
Electroplate with ebonized wood details, England, ca.1880-90, designed by Christopher Dresser
Physical Description
The ovoid body is surmounted by a plain rim supporting the lid and is secured within the stand by a similar flange at the base. The plain tapering spout angled sharply upwards is attached to the front of the body near the base directly opposite is a double T shaped handle of ebonised wood which is attached to the body by rivets in two plain sockets. The lid is a plain disc with a small expansion hole drilled off centre and an internal flange to secure it within the neck of the vessel. The ebonised wooden finial is ovoid repeating the outline of the vessel and is surmounted by a moulded metal knop which is the top of the thread running through the centre, securing the finial by a circular nut on the underside of the lid.
Dimensions
  • Height: 18.5cm
  • Width: 20cm
  • Diameter: 13cm
Style
Object history
A similar version of this design was also manufactured in silver.
Production
Manufacturer unidentified
Summary
Christopher Dresser was one of the most talented designers to graduate from the South Kensington, Government School of Design. Unlike Ruskin or Morris, he fully accepted the implications of mechanical production and was always more interested in design than craftsmanship. In 1876, he made his first visit to Japan which had a profound effect on him. Many of his highly original shapes for metalwork arose out of a dual concern for the techniques for mass production and the function of the articles he designed.
Collection
Accession Number
M.935-1983

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record createdSeptember 16, 2002
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