Pair of Shoes thumbnail 1
Pair of Shoes thumbnail 2
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Not currently on display at the V&A

Pair of Shoes

1860s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The uppers of these lady's shoes are worked in the Leghorn remaille technique, where fine straw plaits are joined edge to edge with invisible ladder stitching. This work was produced in Tuscany and was mainly used for high quality hats. However, at the height of its popularity straw plait was used to decorate almost all kinds of clothing - from bodices to parasols. The Italian-made plaits used for the shoes were probably sold as flat sheets, maybe even cut into the pattern pieces, and then assembled with various trimmings. This means that the shoe could have been made up anywhere in Europe, or even in America.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Shoe
  • Shoe
Materials and Techniques
Straw plaits, thread and splints lined with silk; leather and linen covered card decoration; hand stitched
Brief Description
Shoes, straw, Germany, 1860s



Physical Description
Shoes of plaited straw lined with red silk. Trimmed around opening with straw braid (of straw thread and splints) and pleated, originally red, now grey-red, silk ribbon. Hand stitched with red silk thread. Decoration at centre front of ribbon bow and cut leaf shapes of card covered with probably linen. Heel covered with white kid. German, 1860s.
Dimensions
  • Heal to toe length: 230mm
  • Sole of heel to upper back height: 68mm
Height measured from sole of heel to upper back
Credit line
Given by Messrs Harrods Ltd.
Summary
The uppers of these lady's shoes are worked in the Leghorn remaille technique, where fine straw plaits are joined edge to edge with invisible ladder stitching. This work was produced in Tuscany and was mainly used for high quality hats. However, at the height of its popularity straw plait was used to decorate almost all kinds of clothing - from bodices to parasols. The Italian-made plaits used for the shoes were probably sold as flat sheets, maybe even cut into the pattern pieces, and then assembled with various trimmings. This means that the shoe could have been made up anywhere in Europe, or even in America.
Collection
Accession Number
T.620&A-1913

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record createdAugust 22, 2002
Record URL