Carpet

1870-1876 (made)
Carpet thumbnail 1
Carpet thumbnail 2
+4
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The most noticeable elements of this pattern (sometimes called the Herati pattern) are a diamond and four curling leaves. It remains one of the most popular carpet patterns and appears with many variations: radically different effects can be achieved by simply changing the proportion of the motifs or by using colour to highlight particular parts of it. This and other carpets given to the Museum by the Shah, were chosen by his ministers to represent the very best being woven in Iran in 1876. This carpet was woven in Senha (Sanadaj).


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Wool knotted pile, on cotton warp and weft; symmetrical knot, tied around two warp threads and off-set; 280 knots per sq. in (4,480 per sq. dm) WARP: white cotton; Z4S; 40 threads to the inch (160 per dm); depressed. WEFT: white cotton; Z3S; difficult to ascertain but probably 1 shoot after every two rows of knots; 14 knots to the inch (56 per dm). PILE: wool; 8 colours: dark red, red, yellow, green, light blue, pink, dark brown, white; symmetrical knot tied around 2 warp threads and off-set (knotted on different pairs on alternate rows); 280 knots per sq. inch (4480 per sq. dm). Alternate rows of knots are pulled in different directions because two knots (counted vertically along the warp) share three warp threads. The slant is not done intentionally - it is the by-product of the off-set knotting and the absence of a sinuous weft in the second shed, which might have pulled them into common alignment. NOTE: off-set knotting can add stability to a structure when there is only one weft after every two rows of knots. One weft every two rows makes a finer carpet. SIDE FINISH: one cord oversewn with red wool. END FINISH: Lower: one row of weft twining with red and green wool above a warp fringe 3" (7.5 cm) long. Upper: as lower with warp fringe 5" (15 cm) long.
Brief Description
Middle East, Textile, Carpet; Carpet, wool knotted pile on cotton foundation, angular central medallion with "Herati" design, Senna (Sanandaj), Iran, 1870-1875
Physical Description
Carpet, hand knotted woollen pile on cotton warp and weft, Persian, Sehna [Sarandaj].

DESIGN: Field: dark brown ground with a small-scale Herati pattern with light blue and green leaves. There is a central diamond shaped medallion with a small pendant-like extension top and bottom. The pattern and colouring is like that of the field. Around this is a very large slightly serrated diamond medallion whose sides have been cut by the borders. The pattern is as the other areas but on a white ground.

Main Border: yellow ground with a green meander outlined in red with small serrated leaves in brown and white, a diagonal bud in white and red and a full blossom alternating in white/red/brown and white/red/light blue.

Inner and Outer Borders: light blue ground with a thin brown meander with red flowers and yellow leaves and buds.

Catalogue Date 5 April 2000
Dimensions
  • Length: 230cm (maximum)
  • Width: 139cm (maximum)
  • Weight: 7kg
  • Height: 2mm (Pile height)
Credit line
Given by His Majesty Nasir al-Din Shah
Object history
In 1877, Nasruddin Shah, the Qajar ruler of Iran, approved a donation of contemporary textiles and carpets to the South Kensington Museum. Organised via Robert Murdoch Smith and Qajar minister Emin al-Mulk, the donation consisted of 14 carpets and 60 other examples of textiles, and was directly intended to advertise Iran's textile industry to British consumers. The accompanying letter to the Museum's Lords of Committee outlined the strategy "We have no doubt whatever that the English Nation has always viewed our manufactures in a kind and friendly manner; and although the Persian Arts have not attained a high rank, nevertheless they have been viewed with a friendly eye and examined in a partial spirit. Such being the case, H.I.M. the Shah resolved that a small quantity of the produce of this country - manufactures by Persian workmen of the present day - should be presented to the said Museum."
Subjects depicted
Summary
The most noticeable elements of this pattern (sometimes called the Herati pattern) are a diamond and four curling leaves. It remains one of the most popular carpet patterns and appears with many variations: radically different effects can be achieved by simply changing the proportion of the motifs or by using colour to highlight particular parts of it. This and other carpets given to the Museum by the Shah, were chosen by his ministers to represent the very best being woven in Iran in 1876. This carpet was woven in Senha (Sanadaj).
Collection
Accession Number
827-1877

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record createdAugust 13, 2002
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