Panel thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Panel

1953 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Needlework Development Scheme (NDS) was established in 1934 to encourage embroidery and to raise the standard of design in Britain. Organised by four Scottish art schools, Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow, its collection of foreign and British embroidery was available to domestic science and training colleges, women's institutions and schools, as well as art schools. By 1939, the Scheme had acquired some 900 embroideries but the outbreak of WWII closed the Scheme and the collection was retained by the four original art schools. Glasgow School of Art was instrumental in re-starting the scheme late in 1944 and the NDS was gradually expanded to encompass other art schools in the United Kingdom where embroidery was caught. The NDS was disbanded in 1961 when funding was withdrawn, although it was recognised that the Scheme had achieved its aims. Its collection was divided and distributed to various organisations included the Embroiderers Guild, The National Museum of Scotland and the V&A.
Beryl Dean trained at the Royal School of Needlework and taught at Eastbourne College of Art. She is best known for her ecclesiastical embroidery. She was awarded an MBE for services to embroidery in 1975. In an interview on 13 December 1996 Beryl Dean, aged 86, said that she had found the gold fabric for this panel in Rouen market.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Hand embroidered gold, silk and cotton thread on linen
Brief Description
Panel of hand-embroidered linen in silks and gold threads, designed and embroidered by Beryl Dean, England, 1953
Physical Description
Panel of hand-embroidered linen in silks and gold threads. With a figure representing St Peter. The stitches used include a variety of laid work fillings, encroaching satin stitch, split stitch and couching.
Dimensions
  • Width: 11.5in
  • Length: 37.1cm
Credit line
Given by the Needlework Development Scheme
Object history
The Needlework Development Scheme had commissioned Beryl Dean to produce work to inspire more innovative ecclesiastical embroidery. They gave her five titles covering types of items and technqiues and she produced samples covering the areas she felt most inspired by. She said that she also did some good items at the time which she did not let the NDS have. Subjects she did work were from the titles 'laidwork' and 'altar linen'.
Production
Needlework Development Scheme 4133



Attribution note: In an interview on 13 December 1996 Beryl Dean, aged 86, said that she had found the gold fabric for this panel in Rouen market.
Summary
The Needlework Development Scheme (NDS) was established in 1934 to encourage embroidery and to raise the standard of design in Britain. Organised by four Scottish art schools, Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow, its collection of foreign and British embroidery was available to domestic science and training colleges, women's institutions and schools, as well as art schools. By 1939, the Scheme had acquired some 900 embroideries but the outbreak of WWII closed the Scheme and the collection was retained by the four original art schools. Glasgow School of Art was instrumental in re-starting the scheme late in 1944 and the NDS was gradually expanded to encompass other art schools in the United Kingdom where embroidery was caught. The NDS was disbanded in 1961 when funding was withdrawn, although it was recognised that the Scheme had achieved its aims. Its collection was divided and distributed to various organisations included the Embroiderers Guild, The National Museum of Scotland and the V&A.

Beryl Dean trained at the Royal School of Needlework and taught at Eastbourne College of Art. She is best known for her ecclesiastical embroidery. She was awarded an MBE for services to embroidery in 1975. In an interview on 13 December 1996 Beryl Dean, aged 86, said that she had found the gold fabric for this panel in Rouen market.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.196-1962

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdAugust 2, 2002
Record URL