Cupid the Earth Upholder thumbnail 1
Cupid the Earth Upholder thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Cupid the Earth Upholder

Pendant
about 1902 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The Scottish artist Phoebe Traquair created embroidery, murals and illuminated manuscripts as well as painted enamels. She distinguished between 'epic' (large-scale) work such as tapestries and wall painting, and 'lyric' (small-scale) work. In 1901she began her apprenticeship in enamelling to Lady Gibson Carmichael at Castlecraig. From this time enamelling replaced book illustration as her favourite small-scale medium. She created vivid foiled enamel scenes, usually of mythical or spiritual subjects. Both her technique and designs were strongly influenced by medieval and Renaissance examples. Her jewellery, triptychs, caskets and mounted cups and covers, for instance, are all based on historical pieces.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Gold and enamel with foiled glass
Brief description
Pendant of gold and enamel made by Phoebe Traquair, Edinburgh, 1902, known as 'Cupid the Earth Upholder'
Physical description
'Cupid the Earth Upholder'. Gold, enamelled and set with coloured foiled glass. Signed by the artist, titled and dated 1902 on the reverse.



The pendant is made from gold and enamel with foil on copper: showing a kneeling Cupid with widespread wings holding up a green globe on a vivid blue background. The enamelled plaque is modelled in relief, set in a pierced gold surround with one large and two small pendant drops of enamel set in gold. The gold surround is with two semi-precious stones. The central plaque is inscribed on the back: Cupid The Earth Upholder P.1902
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.5cm
  • Width: 4.2cm
Style
Credit line
Given by Mrs Teresa Crompton
Subjects depicted
Summary
The Scottish artist Phoebe Traquair created embroidery, murals and illuminated manuscripts as well as painted enamels. She distinguished between 'epic' (large-scale) work such as tapestries and wall painting, and 'lyric' (small-scale) work. In 1901she began her apprenticeship in enamelling to Lady Gibson Carmichael at Castlecraig. From this time enamelling replaced book illustration as her favourite small-scale medium. She created vivid foiled enamel scenes, usually of mythical or spiritual subjects. Both her technique and designs were strongly influenced by medieval and Renaissance examples. Her jewellery, triptychs, caskets and mounted cups and covers, for instance, are all based on historical pieces.
Collection
Accession number
CIRC.210-1953

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Record createdSeptember 5, 2001
Record URL
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