Lampshade Panel thumbnail 1
Lampshade Panel thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Lampshade Panel

ca. 1903 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This silk lampshade panel was made by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh for Hill House, designed by her husband, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, for Walter Blackie between1902 and 1904. Margaret contributed many of the fittings; this panel was made in 1903.

Sisters Margaret and Frances Macdonald were two of the most original artists working in Glasgow in the 1890s. They attended evening classes at the Glasgow School of Art together with Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Herbert Macnair (who worked with Mackintosh from 1889 at the architectural practice, Honeyman & Jeppie). They became known as The Glasgow Four, and created a distinctive decorative style that was disseminated internationally.

Their work became influential through many exhibitions, in particular the fifth exhibition of the Arts and Crafts Society in London (1896), the eighth exhibition of the Vienna Secession (1900) and the Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte Decorativa in Turin (1902). Their work was published in contemporary periodicals, notably The Studio, Dekorative Kunst, Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration and Ver Sacrum. In this way, they provided substantial impetus for the development and recognition of a distinctive Glasgow style in Britain and Europe, although they had few direct imitators.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Embroidered silk, glass, appliquéd, beaded
Brief Description
Panel for a lampshade of embroidered silk and beaded, designed and made by Margaret Macdonald for Hill House, Helensburgh, Scotland, ca. 1903
Physical Description
Panel for a lampshade of embroidered cream silk in satin stitch. A silk ground with a stylised rose pattern interlacing geometrically and appliquéd with glass beads, ribbon and braid in black, green and pink.
Dimensions
  • Length: 41.1cm
  • Width: 44.2cm
  • Centre length: 16.25in
  • Bottom width: 17.5in
  • Width: 585mm (Note: Mount)
  • Height: 582mm (Note: Mount)
  • Depth: 7mm (Note: Mount)
Styles
Credit line
Given by Mrs M. M. Sturrock and Mrs Lang
Object history
From Hill House in Helensburgh, Scotland
Historical context
Hill House was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh: in 1902 the publisher Walter Blackie asked Mackintosh to design a family house for him in Helensburgh. Hill House was started in 1902 and completed by 1904. Margaret contributed some of the fittings.
Summary
This silk lampshade panel was made by Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh for Hill House, designed by her husband, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, for Walter Blackie between1902 and 1904. Margaret contributed many of the fittings; this panel was made in 1903.



Sisters Margaret and Frances Macdonald were two of the most original artists working in Glasgow in the 1890s. They attended evening classes at the Glasgow School of Art together with Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Herbert Macnair (who worked with Mackintosh from 1889 at the architectural practice, Honeyman & Jeppie). They became known as The Glasgow Four, and created a distinctive decorative style that was disseminated internationally.



Their work became influential through many exhibitions, in particular the fifth exhibition of the Arts and Crafts Society in London (1896), the eighth exhibition of the Vienna Secession (1900) and the Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte Decorativa in Turin (1902). Their work was published in contemporary periodicals, notably The Studio, Dekorative Kunst, Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration and Ver Sacrum. In this way, they provided substantial impetus for the development and recognition of a distinctive Glasgow style in Britain and Europe, although they had few direct imitators.
Collection
Accession Number
T.66-1953

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record createdSeptember 5, 2001
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