Mirror

1878 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Giovanni Battista Gatti was a cabinet-maker who specialised in reviving the luxurious inlay techniques that were fashionable during the Renaissance in several Italian cities. He perfected the use of ivory and mother-of-pearl or shell, with ebony or other strongly coloured woods, and small accent pieces of hardstones such as the malachite used on this piece. The authorities of the South Kensington Museum (as the V&A was known until 1899) bought this mirror directly from the 1878 Paris Exhibition, at which Gatti exhibited.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Ebony, inlaid with engraved ivory, abalone and malachite
Brief Description
Mirror, the frame veneered in ebony, inlaid with ivory, shell and malachite
Physical Description
Mirror frame surmounted by a shallow, segmental pediment, veneered in ebony, inlaid with engraved ivory,abalone shell and malachite, the lower apron of the frame with an oval plaque of ivory engraved with a building
Dimensions
  • Height: 72.25cm
  • Width: 47.5cm
Style
Gallery Label
FRAME 670-1878 'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900' Purchased for £32 7s 6d from the Paris 1878 Exhibition.(1987-2006)
Summary
Giovanni Battista Gatti was a cabinet-maker who specialised in reviving the luxurious inlay techniques that were fashionable during the Renaissance in several Italian cities. He perfected the use of ivory and mother-of-pearl or shell, with ebony or other strongly coloured woods, and small accent pieces of hardstones such as the malachite used on this piece. The authorities of the South Kensington Museum (as the V&A was known until 1899) bought this mirror directly from the 1878 Paris Exhibition, at which Gatti exhibited.
Bibliographic Reference
Enrico Colle, Il Mobile dell'Ottocento in Italia. Milan: Electa, 2007, illus. p.392. A biographical note on Gatti is on pp. 443-444
Collection
Accession Number
670-1878

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record createdJune 1, 2001
Record URL