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Grand piano

Grand piano

  • Place of origin:

    Vienna (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1820 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Haschka, Georg (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Pinewood case, veneered with mahogany on the outside and satinwood on the inside; gilt highlighting and ormolu mounts and pedals; painted lid and nameboard

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Sir William Quiller Orchardson RA

  • Museum number:

    460-1907

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Pianos made in Vienna from about 1800 were prized for their sweet tone and light action. They were often fitted, as this one is, with a number of pedals,which activated special musical effects such as drums and bells, used in popular arrangements of martial music. This piano was made between about 1815 and 1820 by Georg Haschka (1772-1828), who owned a small workshop in Vienna. It was later the property of Sir William Quiller Orchardson R.A. (1832-1910), an eminent Scottish painter, who included it in his picture, A Tender Chord.

Place of Origin

Vienna (made)

Date

ca. 1820 (made)

Artist/maker

Haschka, Georg (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Pinewood case, veneered with mahogany on the outside and satinwood on the inside; gilt highlighting and ormolu mounts and pedals; painted lid and nameboard

Marks and inscriptions

Georg Haschka in Wien
George Hashka in Vievva
1) Signature; German; Cursive; Inscribed on damper rail; Haschka, Georg

Dimensions

Length: 230.5 cm, Width: 119.4 cm, Height: 86.4 cm

Labels and date

FORTE-PIANO
By Georg Haschka (Austrian), Vienna, c.1815-20
Pinewood case, veneered with mahogany on the outside and satinwood in the inside. The inside of the lid is decorated with the story of Samson and the lion. The instrument's range is six octaves, FF - f 4. Each note has three strings, with a damper and a single bridge used throughout. In addition to the volume, the eight pedals control a variety of effects, such as the bassoon effect, drums and triangle.

Keyboard Catalogue No.: 43

The term Forte-piano is used to describe the 18th and early 19th century version of the piano. Unlike its iron-reinforced and cross-strung counterpart from about 1850 onwards, the Forte-piano was made entirely of wood, with strings strung in a straight line from behind the keyboard. The Viennese forte-piano had a lighter touch than the English Version, and the strings could be dampened more easily, thus allowing more modulation. To Johann Hummel, Mozart's pupil, the Viennese piano had a "round fluty tone" whereas the English version had "fullness of tone". The different effects were used in "Turkish Music" derived from drums and cymbals used by the Janissary bands.
Georg Haschka (1772-1828) was active from about 1810, until 1828, the year of his death. He had a relatively small workshop, and his wife seems to have carried on the business after his death. A similar piano by Haschka of that date is at the Museum of Applied arts in Budapest.

Given to this Museum by Sir William Orchardson, R.A., who featured it in his painting "A Tender Chord".

460-1907 [pre September 2000]

Materials

Mahogany; Satinwood; Pine; Gold leaf

Techniques

Joining; Gilding; Veneering; Painting

Subjects depicted

Lion

Categories

Musical instruments

Production Type

Unique

Collection

Furniture and Woodwork Collection

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