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On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level D , Shelf F, Case 94, Box 59

Window Plants

Print
1945 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Painter and wood-engraver John Nash moved to Essex in 1944 and fell in love with the Stour Valley, which became a source of inspiration in his art. An accomplished printmaker, Nash helped found the Society of Wood Engravers in 1920, and produced a number of woodcut or -engraved book illustrations for Private Press publishers such as the Golden Cockerel Press in the 1920s and 1930s.

Set up in 1945 by Brenda Rawnsley, the School Prints scheme commissioned well-known artists to create lithographs, which would then be printed in large numbers and sold cheaply to schools for display in classrooms; the aim was to give 'school children an understanding of contemporary art'. Each lithograph had a drawn frame so that the print could be pinned to the wall. In the spirit of post-war optimism, artists responded enthusiastically. The scheme was a unique attempt at giving children access to original works of art in a period of austerity but ended in 1949 because of financial problems. Many of the prints depict a familiar world of everyday rural or urban life, some presenting a version of the pastoral idyll and others scenes of entertainment or leisure.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour lithograph on paper
Brief Description
Colour lithograph, 'Window Plants', School Prints Series, John Nash, 1945
Physical Description
Colour lithograph showing a window from the outside. Inside the room is a woman dressed in green and wearing pince-nez sitting in a pink armchair with a striped tabby cat on her lap. A canary sits in a gold cage suspended from the ceiling. Near the woman is a three pronged bamboo plant stand with blue plant pot and aspidistra. On the window sill are six plant pots, one white ceramic with blue flowers, and five terracotta pots with geraniums, amaryllis, Christmas cactus, aloe vera or varigata.
Dimensions
  • Height: 49.53cm
  • Width: 75.88cm
Taken from Victoria & Albert Museum Department of Prints and Drawings and Department of Paintings Accessions 1957-1958 London: HMSO 1964
Marks and Inscriptions
'John Nash, 1945' (Signed and dated)
Subjects depicted
Summary
Painter and wood-engraver John Nash moved to Essex in 1944 and fell in love with the Stour Valley, which became a source of inspiration in his art. An accomplished printmaker, Nash helped found the Society of Wood Engravers in 1920, and produced a number of woodcut or -engraved book illustrations for Private Press publishers such as the Golden Cockerel Press in the 1920s and 1930s.



Set up in 1945 by Brenda Rawnsley, the School Prints scheme commissioned well-known artists to create lithographs, which would then be printed in large numbers and sold cheaply to schools for display in classrooms; the aim was to give 'school children an understanding of contemporary art'. Each lithograph had a drawn frame so that the print could be pinned to the wall. In the spirit of post-war optimism, artists responded enthusiastically. The scheme was a unique attempt at giving children access to original works of art in a period of austerity but ended in 1949 because of financial problems. Many of the prints depict a familiar world of everyday rural or urban life, some presenting a version of the pastoral idyll and others scenes of entertainment or leisure.
Bibliographic Reference
Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints and Drawings and Department of Paintings Accessions 1957-1958 London: HMSO, 1964
Collection
Accession Number
E.5157-1958

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record createdJune 30, 2009
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