Wall-Lantern

ca. 1730-1740 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This unusual object, which is one of a pair, was designed to hold a candle and would be fixed to the wall. Lanterns had glazed sides to prevent the flame from blowing out, and wall lanterns were used in narrow, draughty spaces such as passages and stairs. (In a hall a larger lantern would usually be suspended from the ceiling.) They invariably had a mirrored back, like this one, to reflect more light. This example and its pair are in the emphatically architectural style associated with the architect and designer William Kent (1685-1748), and they may have been designed for one of the great houses built in Britain in the 1730s-40s in the Palladian style.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Carved mahogany
Dimensions
  • Height: 32in
  • Width: 16in
  • Depth: 9.5in
Style
Gallery Label
W.63 &A-1950 PAIR OF WALL-LANTERNS ENGLISH; about 1730 Carved mahogany Given by Brigadier W.E. Clark, C.M.G., D.S.O., through the National Art-Collections Fund.(pre October 2000)
Credit line
Given by Brigadier W. E. Clark CMG, DSO through Art Fund
Summary
This unusual object, which is one of a pair, was designed to hold a candle and would be fixed to the wall. Lanterns had glazed sides to prevent the flame from blowing out, and wall lanterns were used in narrow, draughty spaces such as passages and stairs. (In a hall a larger lantern would usually be suspended from the ceiling.) They invariably had a mirrored back, like this one, to reflect more light. This example and its pair are in the emphatically architectural style associated with the architect and designer William Kent (1685-1748), and they may have been designed for one of the great houses built in Britain in the 1730s-40s in the Palladian style.
Collection
Accession Number
W.63-1950

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record createdFebruary 16, 2001
Record URL