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Tazza

  • Place of origin:

    Venice (probably, made)

  • Date:

    1550-1600 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Blown glass, with applied and tooled decoration

  • Museum number:

    188-1879

  • Gallery location:

    Glass, Room 131, case 11, shelf 1

This type of shallow glass on a tall stem is called a tazza. It was primarily intended as a drinking glass for red wine. However, it required practice and the utmost care to drink from such a glass without spilling, and being able to do so was probably a sign of great sophistication. Tazze (plural of tazza) were most likely used for special occasions only, which explains why, despite their obvious fragility, a disproportional high number has survived the perils of time.
Tazze could also be used for serving 'sweetmeats'. These were the different sorts of sugared and spiced fruits, conserves, biscuits and other confectionery that made up the final 'sweet' course of a banquet.

Physical description

Drinking glass with wide, shallow bowl on a high stem. The base of the bowl is decorated with trailed decoration.

Place of Origin

Venice (probably, made)

Date

1550-1600 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Blown glass, with applied and tooled decoration

Dimensions

Height: 13.5 cm, Width: 16.0 cm

Object history note

Formerly Robinson Collection

Historical context note

This type of shallow glass on a tall stem is called a tazza. It was primarily intended as a drinking glass for red wine. However, it required practice and the utmost care to drink from such a glass without spilling, and being able to do so was probably a sign of great sophistication. Tazze (plural of tazza) were most likely used for special occasions only, which explains why, despite their obvious fragility, a disproportional high number has survived the perils of time.
Tazze could also be used for serving 'sweetmeats'. These were the different sorts of sugared and spiced fruits, conserves, biscuits and other confectionery that made up the final 'sweet' course of a banquet.

Descriptive line

Tazza, probably Netherlands or Italy (Venice), 1550-1600

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Liefkes, R., Glass, London (V&A) 1997, pp. 50-53, fig. 58.
Ajmar-Wollheim, Marta and Flora Dennis, At Home in Renaissance Italy, London: V&A Publishing, 2006.

Categories

Drinking

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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