Untitled

Print
1972 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Cohen trained as a painter and represented Britain at the 1966 Venice Biennale. In 1968 he became a visiting professor at the University of California at San Diego, where he was introduced to computer programming. In 1971 Cohen took up a post as visiting scholar in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University. This screenprint consists of a series of computer-generated lines, with Letraset lettering applied by the artist. Cohen uses his own artistic logic to identify and connect the different paths, demonstrating his early interest in the new medium of the computer.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Screenprint with Letraset
Brief Description
Screenprint, 'Untitled', artist's proof, by Harold Cohen, 1972.
Physical Description
Screenprint of black, computer-generated lines, with red Letraset lettering.
Dimensions
  • Height: 66.4cm
  • Width: 84.7cm
Copy Number
Artist's proof
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'A.P.' (In pencil, in lower left side. Artist's proof.)
  • 'Harold Cohen, 1972' (In pencil, in lower right side. Artist's signature and date.)
Gallery Label
Harold Cohen born 1928 Untitled 1972 In 1971 Cohen took up a post as visiting scholar in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University. This screenprint consists of a series of computer-generated lines, with Letraset lettering applied by the artist. Cohen uses his own artistic logic to identify and connect the different paths. Screenprint Given by Harold Cohen Museum no. E.338-2009(07/12/2009 - 25/04/2010)
Credit line
Given by Harold Cohen
Summary
Cohen trained as a painter and represented Britain at the 1966 Venice Biennale. In 1968 he became a visiting professor at the University of California at San Diego, where he was introduced to computer programming. In 1971 Cohen took up a post as visiting scholar in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University. This screenprint consists of a series of computer-generated lines, with Letraset lettering applied by the artist. Cohen uses his own artistic logic to identify and connect the different paths, demonstrating his early interest in the new medium of the computer.
Collection
Accession Number
E.338-2009

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record createdJune 30, 2009
Record URL