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Armchair

Armchair

  • Place of origin:

    Norway (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1900 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Kinsarvik, Lars, born 1846 - died 1925 (designer and maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Carved and painted pine

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Sir George Donaldson

  • Museum number:

    4-1901

  • Gallery location:

    On loan

When this chair was shown at the International Exhibition in Paris in 1900, Norway was still ruled by Sweden, and was not to become an independent country for another five years. However, Norwegian manufacturers and designers insisted on having their own pavilion, distinct from the one showing Swedish objects. At the end of the nineteenth century, designers all over northern Europe were turning to their countries' ancient history for inspiration. In Norway, the enthusiasm for vernacular design was powerfully linked to the struggle for independence. In 1867 and 1880 archaeologists had excavated important Viking ships, and designers responded by creating what became known as the Viking or Dragon style.
On this chair, designer Lars Kinsarvik combined motifs that he would have seen in ancient Nordic art and architecture, with the colourful decoration that was typical of more modern Norwegian peasant furnishings.

Physical description

Carved and painted pine. The open back consists of two uprights each terminating in a grotesque horse's head and joined by two curved rails; the lower rail is extended to form the arms penetrating two uprights, which are continuous with the front legs; these uprights are surmounted with a head wearing a cap. The front legs are connected below by a rail. The uprights and top rail of the back, the edges of the seat, the front legs and the rail bewteen them are elaborately carved with interlacing bands, grotesque animals and geometrical ornament painted red, blue, green and yellow. The back legs have each three rosettes. The arm-rail is painted with interlacing bands.

Place of Origin

Norway (made)

Date

ca. 1900 (made)

Artist/maker

Kinsarvik, Lars, born 1846 - died 1925 (designer and maker)

Materials and Techniques

Carved and painted pine

Dimensions

Height: 94 cm, Width: 55.9 cm, Depth: 54 cm, :

Object history note

An identical chair was sold by the auctioneers Dreweatt Neate, 3 November 2004 (the lot number unknown, but illustrated in The Antiques Trade Gazette on 11 December 2004.

Descriptive line

Carved and painted pine armchair, decorated in the Dragon style

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Greenhalgh, Paul Ed., Art Nouveau : 1890 - 1914. London: V&A Publications, 2000. 464 p., 2.19pl, ill. ISBN 1851772774, p. 52

Labels and date

Europe and America 1800-1900, room 101

PAINTED ARMCHAIR
About 1900
Shown at the International Exhibition, Paris, 1900

The chair is a celebration of Norwegian history and culture. It was made four years before Norway gained independence from Sweden by a designer who worked in the so-called 'dragon style'. Popular around 1900, and approximately based on Viking models, this style represented a version of traditional peasant ornament.

Norway; designed and made by Lars Kinsarvik
Painted pine

Given by Sir George Donaldson [05/08/2015]
ARMCHAIR

4-1901

'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900'

When acquired this chair was credited to C. G. Christensen, who may have been the retailer. However it is clearly the work of Kinsarvik, the best of the carvers who worked in the 'dragon style' in about 1900. Approximately based on Viking models, this style represents a Norwegian equivalent of peasant ornament.

Given by Sir George Donaldson [1987-2006]
Europe and America 1800-1900, room 101

PAINTED ARMCHAIR
About 1900
Shown at the International Exhibition, Paris, 1900

Norway; designed and made by Lars Kinsarvik

Pine, carved and painted

Museum no. 4-1901
Given by Sir George Donaldson

The chair is a celebration of Norwegian history and culture. It was made four years before Norway gained independence from Sweden by a designer who worked in the so-called 'dragon style'. Popular around 1900, and approximately based on Viking models, this style represented a Norwegian version of traditional peasant ornament. [2006]

Materials

Pine

Techniques

Carving; Painting

Subjects depicted

Horse; Animals; Rosettes; Dragons

Categories

Furniture; Folk Art

Collection

Furniture and Woodwork Collection

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