Not currently on display at the V&A

Chippendale Chair with Grandmother pattern

Chair
1984 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This chair, designed by the architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, has been celebrated for re-introducing decoration and historic form into contemporary furniture. The name of the chair refers to the designs of Thomas Chippendale, the most famous British furniture designer of the 18th century. Venturi used Chippendale's designs for chairbacks as an inspiration for this model but the materials, techniques and design of the chair differ radically from that of the 18th century designer.

The chair is constructed of plywood, with a simple cut-out detailing on the back rest of the chair. The laminate used to coat the plywood is decorated with floral emblems and what has been described by the design team as, an 'ant pattern' - a pattern of dashes. Called 'Grandmother', the pattern was created by Venturi Scott Brown in 1983. The inspiration for the pattern came from a table cloth belonging to a Venturi Scott Brown associate and was also produced as a cotton sateen fabric for the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Laminated plywood
Brief Description
Chair, Chippendale with 'Grandmother' pattern, deisgned by Venturi Scott Brown, manufactured by Knoll International. USA, 1984.
Physical Description
Laminated plywood chair with a plastic floral laminate surface.
Dimensions
  • Height: 98cm
  • Width: 69cm
  • Depth: 63.5cm
Gallery Label
  • "CHIPPENDALE" CHAIR with "Grandmother" pattern decoration Designed by Robert Venturi (American, b. 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (American, b. 1931) Laminated plywood with plastic laminate surface Manufactured by Knoll International, New York, USA 1984 This chair was much celebrated for reintroducing decoration and historic form in to the mainstream of contemporary furniture. It was collected due to its notoriety and of that of the designers, celebrated American architects and theorists and designers of the Sainsbury extension to the National Gallery.
  • CHAIR: CHIPPENDALE WITH 'GRANDMOTHER' PATTERN Designed by Robert Venturi ( North American, born 1925) Made by Knoll International, New York, USA, 1984 Laminated plywood with plastic laminate surface Given by the manufacturer W.21-1990 Designed by the architect (designer of the recent extension to the National Gallery), it is one of a series of chairs based in literally superficial interpretations of historic styles. Although cut-out plywood is normally an inexpensive manufacturing technology, this series proved too expensive for the market place and is no longer produced.
Credit line
Given by the manufacturer
Subject depicted
Summary
This chair, designed by the architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, has been celebrated for re-introducing decoration and historic form into contemporary furniture. The name of the chair refers to the designs of Thomas Chippendale, the most famous British furniture designer of the 18th century. Venturi used Chippendale's designs for chairbacks as an inspiration for this model but the materials, techniques and design of the chair differ radically from that of the 18th century designer.



The chair is constructed of plywood, with a simple cut-out detailing on the back rest of the chair. The laminate used to coat the plywood is decorated with floral emblems and what has been described by the design team as, an 'ant pattern' - a pattern of dashes. Called 'Grandmother', the pattern was created by Venturi Scott Brown in 1983. The inspiration for the pattern came from a table cloth belonging to a Venturi Scott Brown associate and was also produced as a cotton sateen fabric for the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia.
Collection
Accession Number
W.21-1990

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record createdSeptember 25, 2000
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