Uncut Robe thumbnail 1
Uncut Robe thumbnail 2
+13
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
China, Room 44, The T.T. Tsui Gallery

Uncut Robe

mid 19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This uncut silk fabric shows the process of how imperial robes were made. Three lengths of silk, two long pieces and an outer side-fastening flap were sewn together to form a vertical seam down the centre. The fabric was then embroidered to shape the body and upper sleeves of the robe. The embroidery also formed the cutting line for final tailoring at the palace workshop.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gilt and silvered metallic threads couched on twill weave silk
Brief Description
Uncut robe, gilt and silver metallic threads counched on blue silk , China, mid 19th century, Qing dynasty
Physical Description
Uncut blue silk fabric for a dragon robe, embroidered in gilt and silvered metallic threads with dragons chasing flaming pearls, surrounded by scrolling clouds, auspicious symbols, bats and 'shou' (longevity) characters. The hem and upper sleeve ends are edged with auspicious symbols and rolling waves above diagonal stripes that represent 'lishui' (standing water).
Dimensions
  • Right length: 307.6cm
  • Left length: 307cm
  • Top width: 148cm
  • Bottom width: 147.5cm
Production
Attribution note when acquired: "possibly from Canton (Guangzhou)"
Summary
This uncut silk fabric shows the process of how imperial robes were made. Three lengths of silk, two long pieces and an outer side-fastening flap were sewn together to form a vertical seam down the centre. The fabric was then embroidered to shape the body and upper sleeves of the robe. The embroidery also formed the cutting line for final tailoring at the palace workshop.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.305-1935

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 25, 2009
Record URL