Not currently on display at the V&A

Interior of the Golden Temple, Amritsar

Painting
Probably Feb 1854 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

William Carpenter was trained at the Royal Academy Schools. He was in India from 1850 to 1856, during which time he travelled extensively from Bombay (Mumbai) and across western India to Rajasthan, Delhi, Kashmir, Lahore and Afghanistan. His depiction of every day street scenes and groups of people is remarkably accurate and animated, his portraits vividly capturing the character of his sitters and the glowing effects of sunlight as cityscapes and architectural monuments. Brilliantly executed in a range of warm colours, his watercolours evoke a gentle romanticism.

After his return to England, The Illustrated London News published some of his watercolours. In 1881, he exhibited 275 of his paintings in a one-man show in the South Kensington Museum, London. This entire collection was subsequently acquired by the V&A.

This image shows the richly decorated interior of the Golden Temple. Worshippers are gathered around the Guru Granth Sahib, the sacred book of the Sikhs which, rests on a red cushion. Through his use of colour, light and shade, Carpenter manages to evoke a sense of the spiritual nature of the ceremony.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
watercolour on paper
Brief Description
Interior of the Golden Temple, Amritsar by William Carpenter, paintings, watercolour on paper, India, 1854.
Physical Description
This view shows the richly decorated interior of the Golden Temple. Worshippers are gathered around the Guru Granth Sahib, the sacred book of the Sikhs which rests on a red cushion under a canopy.
Dimensions
  • Height: 25.8cm
  • Width: 35cm
Gallery Label
This view shows the richly decorated interior of the Golden Temple. Worshippers are gathered around the Guru Granth Sahib, the sacred book of the Sikhs which, rests on a red cushion. Through his use of colour, light and shade, Carpenter manages to evoke a sense of the spiritual nature of the ceremony.(1/12/2008)
Object history
Historical significance: William Carpenter (1818-99)



William Carpenter was trained at the Royal Academy Schools, and was the eldest son of the distinguished portrait painter Margaret Sarah Carpenter and William Hookham Carpenter, who became Keeper of the Prints and Drawings Department at the British Museum.



He was in India from 1850 t0 1856, during which time he travelled extensively from Bombay (Mumbai) and across western India to Rajasthan, Delhi, Kashmir, Lahore and Afghanistan. His depiction of every day street scenes and groups of people is remarkably accurate and animated, his portraits vividly capturing the character of his sitters and the glowing effects of sunlight as cityscapes and architectural monuments. Brilliantly executed in a range of warm colours, his watercolours evoke a gentle romanticism.



After his return to England, The Illustrated London News published some of his watercolours. In 1881, he exhibited 275 of his paintings in a one-man show in the South Kensington Museum, London. This entire collection was subsequently acquired by the V&A.
Place Depicted
Summary
William Carpenter was trained at the Royal Academy Schools. He was in India from 1850 to 1856, during which time he travelled extensively from Bombay (Mumbai) and across western India to Rajasthan, Delhi, Kashmir, Lahore and Afghanistan. His depiction of every day street scenes and groups of people is remarkably accurate and animated, his portraits vividly capturing the character of his sitters and the glowing effects of sunlight as cityscapes and architectural monuments. Brilliantly executed in a range of warm colours, his watercolours evoke a gentle romanticism.



After his return to England, The Illustrated London News published some of his watercolours. In 1881, he exhibited 275 of his paintings in a one-man show in the South Kensington Museum, London. This entire collection was subsequently acquired by the V&A.



This image shows the richly decorated interior of the Golden Temple. Worshippers are gathered around the Guru Granth Sahib, the sacred book of the Sikhs which, rests on a red cushion. Through his use of colour, light and shade, Carpenter manages to evoke a sense of the spiritual nature of the ceremony.
Bibliographic References
  • Rohatgi P. and Parlett G., assisted by Imray S. and Godrej P. Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists: Paintings and Drawings from the Victoria and Albert Museum, 17th to the early 20th century. Published by Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai, in association with V&A, London, 2008. ISBN 81-901020-9-5.p. 275, pl. 30
  • Patel, Divia; Rohatgi, Pauline and Godrej, Pheroza, "Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists: an exhibition of paintings and drawings from the 17th to the early 20th century organised by the V&A and CSMVS". Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), Mumbai and Victoria and Albert Museum, 2008, ISBN:81-901020-8-7p. 64
Collection
Accession Number
IS.47-1882

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 25, 2009
Record URL