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Not currently on display at the V&A

Necklace

1800-1850 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This delicate necklace was originally part of the traditional costume worn in the Nuremberg region of Germany, where it was known as a Hopfenkette (Hop chain). These necklaces usually had two tiers, of alternating filigree links and coloured stones or pastes, at the front, with a pendant linking them in the centre. They also had loops at the ends, for a ribbon to fasten them, rather than a snap clasp. This necklace was probably converted from such a Hopfenkette to make it more attractive to potential western buyers; it was bought in Nuremberg by the donor's father, T. Oldham Barlow RA, as a present for her.

It was illustrated by Sir John Everett Millais in his picture 'The Princes in the Tower', 1878. Traditional jewellery, known at the time as 'peasant jewellery', was very popular among the Pre-Raphaelite painters, who included it in many of their paintings.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver-gilt filigree set with amethysts, with a pendent baroque pearl
Brief Description
Silver-gilt filigree necklace (Hopfenkette) set with amethysts, Nuremberg (Germany), 1800-1850.
Physical Description
Necklace of silver-gilt filigree and amethyst. There are ten octagonal amethysts set in mounts of braided wire, interspersed with quatrefoil filigree motifs with rosettes. In the centre is a filigree pendant shaped like a crown, with a baroque pearl attached to a stylised metal bow hanging from it. The necklace is fastened by a rectangular snap clasp. The clasp, and possibly the pendent pearl, are not original.
Dimensions
  • Length: 34.0cm
  • Height: 4.5cm
  • Depth: 0.4cm
Credit line
Given by Miss Lucy I. Barlow
Summary
This delicate necklace was originally part of the traditional costume worn in the Nuremberg region of Germany, where it was known as a Hopfenkette (Hop chain). These necklaces usually had two tiers, of alternating filigree links and coloured stones or pastes, at the front, with a pendant linking them in the centre. They also had loops at the ends, for a ribbon to fasten them, rather than a snap clasp. This necklace was probably converted from such a Hopfenkette to make it more attractive to potential western buyers; it was bought in Nuremberg by the donor's father, T. Oldham Barlow RA, as a present for her.



It was illustrated by Sir John Everett Millais in his picture 'The Princes in the Tower', 1878. Traditional jewellery, known at the time as 'peasant jewellery', was very popular among the Pre-Raphaelite painters, who included it in many of their paintings.
Collection
Accession Number
M.230-1925

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record createdJune 24, 2009
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