Bin Label

1800-1850 (made)
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Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Wine, bin labels are the lowly but elder relations of decanter labels and served a different purpose. Their origins go back to the mid 17th century when the binning or storage of wines first became important. They then served a utilitarian purpose identifying unmarked bottles in lying in the depths of gentlemen's or wine merchants cellars. They were either directly nailed to a shelf on which were stored the bottles or barrels or directly to the barrel itself.

Bin labels are in the main made from pottery including Delftware and creamware, or broadly speaking, earthenware. They are therefore highly susceptible to damage and destruction and therefore there are far fewer bin labels than decanter labels still in existence. Most bin labels are white or cream coloured with black lettering; the typography varies from the almost primitive to some fine lettering, generally below but sometimes above the glaze.

Earthenware is pottery made from clays that do not vitrify, or are fired at too low a temperature to vitrify them and therefore require a glaze to make them impervious to liquids.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware with applied lettering
Brief Description
Bin label, HERMITAGE. Earthenware, England, 1800-1840
Physical Description
Bin label with the word HERMITAGE. White earthenware, ogival with rounded top.
Dimensions
  • Height: 3.75in
  • Width: 5.5in
Marks and Inscriptions
HERMITAGE
Credit line
P.J. Cropper Bequest
Summary
Wine, bin labels are the lowly but elder relations of decanter labels and served a different purpose. Their origins go back to the mid 17th century when the binning or storage of wines first became important. They then served a utilitarian purpose identifying unmarked bottles in lying in the depths of gentlemen's or wine merchants cellars. They were either directly nailed to a shelf on which were stored the bottles or barrels or directly to the barrel itself.



Bin labels are in the main made from pottery including Delftware and creamware, or broadly speaking, earthenware. They are therefore highly susceptible to damage and destruction and therefore there are far fewer bin labels than decanter labels still in existence. Most bin labels are white or cream coloured with black lettering; the typography varies from the almost primitive to some fine lettering, generally below but sometimes above the glaze.



Earthenware is pottery made from clays that do not vitrify, or are fired at too low a temperature to vitrify them and therefore require a glaze to make them impervious to liquids.
Bibliographic Reference
Salter, John, ed. Wine labels, 1730-2003, A Worldwide History, Woodbridge, Antique Collectors' Club in association with the Wine Label Circle, 2004. pp.305-313, 353. ISBN: 1851494596.
Collection
Accession Number
M.1606-1944

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record createdJune 24, 2009
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