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Hero Accordion

Accordion
1965 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The accordion is a good model of the real musical instrument, with the two half parts of the body made from wood encased in green marble-effect plastic. When closed the instrument stands upright on small feet (one is missing). This part of the body is a sheet of wood drilled with two rings of holes and backed with coarse white cotton; the wood is painted black. Across the wood is a strap of greyish-blue plastic which is screwed on to the body at each side. When in use, the player places his hand under the strap and it helps support the accordian. At the front are three white plastic buttons which can be depressed. These change the sound of the music and are played with the hand held by the strap.

On the top of the accordion, when closed, are the main keys; seven made from a copper coloured metal and supported on springs. They are shaped as right angles with one end the finger pads and the other ends covering the holes in the accordian which produce changes in the notes. When the instrument is being played, the keys are to the side rather than on top. Behind the key panel is a loop of black cloth through which the player's thumb is passed to help when playing.

Holding the accordion closed are two greyish-blue plastic straps, one on each side, which have a press stud. When released the concertina body can be opened and closed. It is made from 15 segments covered with patterned paper and trimmed with red, white and blue imitation leather.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Metal, wood, plastic and paper
Brief Description
Child's accordion; Hero; China, 1965
Physical Description
The accordion is a good model of the real musical instrument, with the two half parts of the body made from wood encased in green marble-effect plastic. When closed the instrument stands upright on small feet (one is missing). This part of the body is a sheet of wood drilled with two rings of holes and backed with coarse white cotton; the wood is painted black. Across the wood is a strap of greyish-blue plastic which is screwed on to the body at each side. When in use, the player places his hand under the strap and it helps support the accordian. At the front are three white plastic buttons which can be depressed. These change the sound of the music and are played with the hand held by the strap.



On the top of the accordion, when closed, are the main keys; seven made from a copper coloured metal and supported on springs. They are shaped as right angles with one end the finger pads and the other ends covering the holes in the accordian which produce changes in the notes. When the instrument is being played, the keys are to the side rather than on top. Behind the key panel is a loop of black cloth through which the player's thumb is passed to help when playing.



Holding the accordion closed are two greyish-blue plastic straps, one on each side, which have a press stud. When released the concertina body can be opened and closed. It is made from 15 segments covered with patterned paper and trimmed with red, white and blue imitation leather.

Dimensions
  • Height: 17.8cm (closed)
  • Width: 18.4cm (closed)
  • Depth: 10.1cm (closed)
Other: when closed
Production typeMass produced
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'Hero ACCORDION' [with Chinese lettering above]'
  • 'MADE IN SHANGHAI CHINA' [with Chinese lettering above]
Credit line
Given by Paulette Balcombe
Object history
Given to the donor by her aunt and uncle, Marge and Sid Webster (father's sister and brother-in-law) for Christmas 1965. Donor is Paulette Joyce Balcombe, nee Burns, born in 1959. Given to the V&A in 1996 [96/1064].

Collection
Accession Number
B.92-1996

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record createdApril 18, 2000
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