Not currently on display at the V&A

Waistcoat

1900-1904 (designed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Waistcoat made of cotton canvas entirely embroidered with cotton in cross-stitch and vertical tent-stitch, and with panels of laid silk chenille with covered cord decoration. The fronts and pockets are faced with pink silk velvet. Six pearl buttons form the concealed fastening. Lined in white silk satin with the back of the same. At the back is a stay with brass double-pronged buckle.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Embroidered cotton canvas with cotton and chenille, faced with silk velvet, pearl, brass, lined with silk satin
Brief Description
Embroidered cotton canvas with cotton and chenille, designed by H. Creed & Co, Paris, 1900-1904
Physical Description
Waistcoat made of cotton canvas entirely embroidered with cotton in cross-stitch and vertical tent-stitch, and with panels of laid silk chenille with covered cord decoration. The fronts and pockets are faced with pink silk velvet. Six pearl buttons form the concealed fastening. Lined in white silk satin with the back of the same. At the back is a stay with brass double-pronged buckle.
Marks and Inscriptions
  • H. Creed & Co, 25 Rue de la Paix, PARIS (Label at the back)
  • 'Marquis of Anglesea' (Inscribed on label)
Object history
This was owned by Miss Emilie Grigsby (1876-1964) who was a wealthy independent American who came to England from New York. She established a salon which was frequented by writers and the military. She was considered to be one of the great international beauties, with extremely pale, almost transparent skin and golden hair. She was frequently the subject of articles in the New York Times during the early 20th century. Her clothes were purchased from couturiers in London, Paris, and New York, and demonstrated an elegantly avant-garde approach to style.



The Marquis of Anglesea who owned the waistcoat was probably Henry Cyril Paget (16 June 1875-14 March 1905), the 5th Marquis of Anglesey from 1898 to 1905. Known as the "Dancing Marquess" due to his love of performing in his own private theatrical performances, Paget was a notorious figure who led an extravagant lifestyle, spending large amounts of money on extravagant clothing and jewels. Despite an income of £110,000 a year (equivalent to £55 million today), Paget was declared bankrupt in 1904, with debts of £544,000, and his wardrobe and jewels were sold to raise funds to pay his creditors.
Collection
Accession Number
T.177-1967

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record createdJune 24, 2009
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